Fall 2014 Courses

View courses by discipline:

Bible
Cantorial

Education

Hebrew (on campus)

Hebrew (online)

History

Jewish Thought

Liturgy

Music

Pardes

Rabbinics

Ulpan

See the daily schedule

BIBLE
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature  I
Syllabus 

CG BIBLE 502A

Adelman

M, 11 am-1 pm

3

This course entails an introduction to the full complement of biblical poetry in its literary and historical context and to modes of poetic interpretation and analysis. The course will cover selections from the Torah, Psalms, Proverbs and the Book of Job, as well as selections from the Prophets such as Isaiah, Jeremiah and Zechariah. We will discuss poetry imbedded within narrative, genres of prophetic writings, apocalyptic revelations and wisdom literature. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV 

King David in the Bible, Jewish Tradition and Modern Scholarship
Syllabus 

CG BIBLE 528 Schimmel Th, 11:15 am-1:15 pm 3

Was David, the second king of Israel, a saint or a sinner, a hero or a villain, or all of these? This course will focus on how David is depicted in the books of Samuel and 1 Kings and in other biblical texts. We will compare the biblical portrayal of David with that of modern scholarship and also look at some rabbinic texts about David to see how he is transformed from the complex and often far from saintly biblical character into a paragon of rabbinic spirituality. Some of the texts will be studied in Hebrew and others in English translation. The ability to read basic Hebrew is recommended. 

Back to top
         
CANTORIAL
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

How to Chant Torah
Syllabus 

CG CANTR 528

Schwartz

Online

3

In this online course, students learn the history and analysis of the punctuation system underlying the chanting of the Hebrew Bible. Through audio coaching, students learn a traditional Ashkenazic mode for the public cantillation of the Torah and correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew. Prerequisite: facility with reading Hebrew. Cantorial students may audit only; will not count for graduate credit for master's students in the cantorial program.

Basic Cantillation
Syllabus 

CG CANTR 519

Treitman

F, 9-11:15 am

3

This class is an introduction to the basic concepts of Torah cantillation. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring the skills needed to chant Torah on weekdays, Sabbaths and festivals using a common Ashkenazi trope. Topics will also include the rituals surrounding the Torah service, the history of cantillation/trope, correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew and the underlying syntactic structure of the system of cantillation. While this course is primarily for rabbinical students, others are welcome (depending on size of the class), provided they have adequate sense of musical pitch and the ability to read and translate biblical Hebrew. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or permission of the instructor. Does not count for graduate credit for students in CEP. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV or permission of instructor

Rosh Hashanah Nusach
Syllabus 

CG CANTR 553

Mayer

M, 9-11 am; W, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

4

Students receive instruction on the modes and motifs of Rosh Hashana and how to lead services using motivic improvisation within the established framework of received Ashkenazic tradition. Students also learn appropriate congregational melodies. Students are also introduced to selected cantorial recitatives, and coached on their authentic rendering. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Ashkenazi Nusach

Cantor Pro Seminar
Syllabus 

CE CANTR 800

Richmond

M, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

3

Students learn about the history of the cantorate, the theologies of the various denominations, as well as practical matters facing cantors in the profession today.

Cantorial Coaching

CG CANTR 579

Staff

TBA

1

This course provides coaching by a practicing cantor, who will guide the student according to his or her individual needs. Goals of coaching are to increase facility with prayer-leading and to improve vocal and musical interpretations of selected repertoire as pertains to the Jewish lifecycle. The student will be evaluated on the benchmark requirements by the third year of residency to ascertain proficiency. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned
into one of the SJM programs or by permission of the SJM. May be repeated
for credit.

Cantorial Internship I

CG CANTR 921

Treitman

TBA

1

Students spend a semester on location in a synagogue, observing a practicing cantor. The on-site cantor meets with and coaches the student in the practical application of skills learned in the classroom. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the SJM programs.

Back to top
         
EDUCATION
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Models of Teaching
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 601 C1

Rodenstein

F, 9-11:15 am

3

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson-planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.

Models of Teaching
Syllabus

CG EDUC 601 W1

Rodenstein

Online

3

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.

Human Development and Learning
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 802

Price

Online

3

This course explores the relationship between human development and a lifelong trajectory of Jewish growth and learning. By exploring various developmental theories, including cognitive, psychosocial and moral development, students will gain a deeper understanding of the developmental needs of, challenges facing and opportunities for learners from early childhood through adulthood. Over the course of the semester, students will both analyze and design Jewish educational programs that address learners’ developmental needs. 

Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish Education
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 707

Skolnick Einhorn and Shire

W, 6:30-8:30 pm
Dates: 9/10/14, 10/1/14, 11/5/14, 12/3/14, 1/28/15, 2/18/15

1

This research seminar is, in many ways, the culmination of a student’s years of study at Hebrew College and provides students with the opportunity to integrate their learning of Judaic texts with educational theories and practice. The final project allows students to further investigate a topic that intrigues them and relates to their work. Throughout the yearlong project, students will be guided by the seminar instructors, a faculty adviser of their choosing and by the seminar community itself. The project is then submitted as a bound written paper and presented orally at an end-of-year day of celebration. 

Families, School and Community
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 503

Katzman

Online

3

This course will provide students with an understanding of the theories, best practices and skills of relationship-building among families, schools and communities, in both broad educational environments and in Jewish schooling, in particular. We will consider the impact that family, school and community partnerships have upon children’s’ education and development. Factors that impact these partnerships, such as cultural and religious values, societal forces, communication skills and differing expectations of parents and teachers will be explored. The course work will provide students with a theoretical basis on which they will develop a vision and plan for building partnerships among families, schools and community. 

Curriculum Design for Teaching God and Israel
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 683 

Price

Online

3

The overarching enduring understanding for this course is that Jewish educational curricula, when intentionally and effectively designed, can serve as a guide to help students encounter and wrestle with complex ideas such as God and Israel. In order to uncover this enduring understanding, this course will explore both theoretical frameworks of curriculum development as well as pedagogic applications of how the subject matter of God and Israel can be taught in liberal Jewish settings. Throughout the course, students will work through the various stages necessary to construct a curriculum focused on questions related to either God or Israel and will end the semester with a finished product that can be implemented in a learning setting.   

Experiential Learning Online: The Jewish Court of All Time
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 690

Skolnick Einhorn

Online

3

In this new course, students will explore the role of technology, online games and role play in experiential Jewish education. Interacting as mentors in the Jewish Court of All Time, a middle-school online history simulation in Jewish day schools, students will work to understand the online learning environment and philosophies for engaging students in "native" environments that potentially encourage deeper interactions and learning. At the same time, course readings, exercises and discussions will hone students’ ability to leverage online experiential learning toward specific learning outcomes, while managing potential distractions, glitches and non-participation by the learners. The course will have implication for both online and in-person learning environments, as well as for multiple educational settings.   

Supervised Field Experience I

CG EDUC 915 

Schultz

This is a yearlong course

1

Course consists of supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Date/times to be arranged with instructor. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching

Supervised Field Experience: Early Childhood Education I

CG EDUC 926

Schultz

This is a yearlong course

1

Full academic yearlong experince may include a mentoring relationship and/or arranged group visits to a variety of early childhood settings. Students will keep a journal to focus on observation, reflection and application. All experiences will be coordinated by the Director of Field Experiences. Date/times to be arranged with instructor. Prerequisite: Certificate in Early Childhood Jewish Education

Supervised Field Experience: Early Childhood Education II

CG EDUC 927 Schultz This is a yearlong course 1

Full academic year supervised field experience in an early childhood Jewish setting. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be designed to meet the professional needs of the students. Focus is on application and integration of expanded knowledge. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. All experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Date/times to be arranged with instructor. Prerequisite: Supervised Field Experience: Early Childhood Education I

Case Studies in Special Education: Technology and Curriculum Accommodations
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 585 Margolis Online 3

This course will focus on key case studies that have impacted the delivery and definition of special education in this country and Jewish special education. Two main foci will be on cases surrounding assistive technology and curriculum accommodations. The goal of these focal points is for students to understand how special education is implemented in various Jewish settings (day school, religious schools, experiential education settings, etc.). Current issues will also be addressed, e.g., services provided at religious institutions by state-funded staff.

Supervised Field Experience in Special Education

CG EDUC 924 Schultz This is a yearlong course 1

This course is a full academic yearlong supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, camp, etc.) serving students with a variety of special needs. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position could be the basis for the experience with a focus on expanding the role to include a wide range of skills. All experiences must be approved by the Director of Field Experiences.

Case Studies in Jewish Special Education
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 585A Margolis

Online:
Sept. 8- Oct. 8

1

This one-credit course — the first five-week module of Case Studies in Special Education: Technology and Curriculum Accommodations (listed above) — will focus on several introductory case studies that have impacted the delivery and definition of special education in this country and Jewish special education. This overview course will give students the background for understanding the evolution of special-education service delivery in American schools and in Jewish educational settings (schools, synagogues, camps). Students will also have the opportunity to research current case studies in their field of interest and/or geographical location, e.g., special education services in Israel.

Accommodations, Modifications and EdTech
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 585B Margolis Online: Oct. 8-Dec. 19 2

What would you do if Helen Keller, James “Radio” Kennedy and Albert Einstein were your students in a classroom of 25 students? How would you educate them? Prior to 1972 in Massachusetts (and 1975 nationwide in the USA), your answer would be, “I wouldn’t. They would not be in my class.” Since then, this is one of the questions educators face each year as they have students with all types of opportunities for growth. This course will prepare students to implement accommodations and modifications in curricula.  Technology will be studied as an arena to develop accommodations. By the end of the course, students will be able to answer, (1) How does the teacher develop curricular accommodations among students with and without special needs, and between students and teachers? (2)  What special education practices have been accepted as good universal teaching practices? (3) What roles can technology play in designing accommodations?

Philosophies of Education and Leadership in Jewish Thought and Practice
Syllabus

ED JLS 902 Shire Online: Sept. 8-Oct. 24 3

The work in this course is divided into two parts. In the first part, we will examine some important modern philosophers of Jewish education, in order to become familiar with some of the different approaches in this field and the purposes of Jewish education. In the second part, we will attempt to move from these more abstract levels of reflection to contemplate concrete areas and issues in contemporary Jewish education. This will give us a chance to explore how philosophical perspectives inform educational strategies and practices, whether explicitly or implicitly; it will also provide an opportunity for students to begin to spell out their own philosophical positions on real topics in day-to-day Jewish education, as they contemplate their educational leadership in these areas and challenges. Enrollment is limited to students in the Jewish Educational Leadership program, or by permission of instructor. 

Back to top
         
HEBREW (ON CAMPUS)
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary. 

COURSE TITLE

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Hebrew V
Syllabus

CG HEBRW 205 

Davis

M, Tu, Th; 2:30-4 pm

4

Building on Hebrew III and IV, the two-semester sequence of Hebrew V and VI focuses on more advanced Modern Hebrew language structures and prose writings. Students will deepen their understanding of the Hebrew language, with emphasis on skill acquisition and development through the extensive use of classical and modern texts. This course gives a systematic presentation of grammatical and syntactic principles of biblical and rabbinic Hebrew (including vocabulary). Texts of different styles, such as narrative, poetry, prophecy and wisdom literature, are examined with an emphasis on literary analysis.

Hebrew VII
Syllabus 

CG HEBRW 207

Bock

Tu&Th; 2:30-4 pm

3

For students who want to work with classical Jewish texts in depth, including students in the rabbinic and cantorial programs, this course will focus on the phonology, morphology and syntax of Biblical Hebrew. Solid prior knowledge of Hebrew, including mastery of the Hebrew verb system, is a prerequisite, as this course will assume such knowledge as it addresses aspects of Hebrew grammar that are distinctive of Biblical Hebrew, including the Tiberian vocalization (nikud) and accentuation system, Biblical Hebrew's larger inventory of verb forms, and various syntactic features of Biblical Hebrew.

Understanding Hebrew Texts I
Syllabus 

MG HEBRW 120 Davis W, 6:30-9:15 pm 4 UG

Students will begin learning basic Hebrew vocabulary and grammar needed to read authentic texts. The course begins with an introduction to Hebrew Alphabet and its vowels system, basic vocabulary and grammar (phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics).  There will be some in-class conversation in Hebrew, but the emphasis will be on developing reading comprehension skills. The pace of the course will be brisk, and a significant investment of study time outside the classroom will be expected.

Understanding Hebrew Texts III
Syllabus 

MG HEBRW 320 Davis Th, 6:30-9:15 pm 4 UG

This course is the third of the Understanding Hebrew Texts sequence. After completing volume III of the Shelabim textbook series, students will read selections from classical texts. Students will apply and extend their knowledge of Hebrew grammar to these texts and build their vocabulary, with the goal of enhancing their ability to independently read and understand Jewish texts in Hebrew. Wherever possible, connections will be made to Hebrew passages with which students are familiar from other contexts. The pace of the course will be brisk and a significant investment of time outside the classroom will be expected. Prerequisite: Hebrew II

Sources: Reading in Hebrew I

MG HEBRW 520 Davis M, 6:30-9:15 pm 3

This course will offer a unique experience of learning Hebrew through its history, via diverse genres of literature. It will draw on a variety of Hebrew texts from a selection of sources including the Bible, mishnah, midrash, medieval texts, Hassidic tales, haskala-era Hebrew literature and modern Hebrew short stories. The anthology of readings will be drawn from the book of Exodus, Ethics of our Fathers, as well as works of Maimonides, Rambam, Yehuda HaLevi, Martin Buber, Shai Agnon, Hayim Nachman Bialik, Meir Shalev, Amos Oz and Etgar Keret. Grammatical concepts will be fully integrated into this literature-oriented course. Prerequisite: Understanding Hebrew Texts IV

Back to top
         
HEBREW (ONLINE)
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary. All online Hebrew classes use Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch) as textbook either Volume 1 or Volume 2. See individual course description.

All courses are offered September 8th through December 19, 2014

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language 

CU HEBRW 010

Levy

Online

0

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students work at their own pace, submitting oral and written homework, and taking online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), the textbook used by Hebrew College’s campus-based and online Hebrew Language programs. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Mekhina will cover the Introductory units of the textbook. Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Hebrew I 

CU HEBRW 110

Levy

Online

4 UG

This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Hebrew I will cover Lessons 1–14 of the textbook. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew IA

 CU HEBRW 111A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
 

Hebrew IB 

 CU HEBRW 111B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew II 

 CU HEBRW 210

Levy

Online

4 UG

A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Hebrew II covers Lessons 15–28 in the textbook. Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIA 

 CU HEBRW 211A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIB 

 CU HEBRW 211B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

Hebrew III 

 CU HEBRW 310

Levy

Online

4 UG

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew III covers Lessons 1-8 in the textbook. Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIA 

 CU HEBRW 311A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIB 

 CU HEBRW 311B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

Hebrew IV 

 CU HEBRW 410

Levy

Online

4 UG

This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew III covers Lessons 9-16 in the textbook. Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

 CU HEBRW 411A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

 CU HEBRW 411B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

Back to top
 
ULPAN HEBREW
 

The Ulpan fall semester will run from Sept. 12 to Dec. 19. Click here for fall course listings.

Back to top
         
HISTORY
         

COURSE TITLE

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Text and Context: Biblical and Rabbinical Periods
Syllabus 

CG HIST 541

Mesch

Online

3

In this course, we will encounter the Tanakh and Rabbinic literature and the cultures and civilizations in which they developed. We will read substantial portions of original texts (in translation) along with key secondary sources to provide students with a framework through which they can gain understanding of the key issues and concepts that underlie these texts and their history. We will also be attentive to the variety of ways that the Bible and Rabbinic literature are read and interpreted. There are no prerequisites for this class; it will be taught as an introductory course for graduate students and as an introduction to graduate work in Jewish Studies.

The Eastern European Era: New Approaches to Understanding the Development of Jewish Life in Europe
Syllabus 

CG HIST 533 Liekis Online 3

The study of Eastern European Jewry has benefited from renewed interest and new capabilities following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the re-emergence of the independent states of East-Central Europe. Conditions of censorship and restricted access have given way to new scholarly initiatives and renewed support. This course will focus on the following themes: a) the specific character of the Jewry of East-Central Europe including religious, cultural, intellectual, political and economic history; b) relations between Jews and non-Jews from the later 18th century under a variety of ruling empires up to recent developments of independence and the revival of Jewish life; c) contemporary attempts to engage the Jewish past by both Jews and non-Jews and attempts to come to terms with the difficult legacy of the Holocaust. The course will also explore the nature of the archival resources now available for genealogical research in the context of gaining a deeper understanding of the social and personal history of the Jewish community.

Back to top
         
JEWISH THOUGHT
         

COURSE TITLE

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Rational Ideal and its Opponents: Four Medieval Jewish Philosophers 
Syllabus 

CG JTHT 519

Mesch

Tu, 11:30 am-1 pm

3

This course will focus on the writings of four of the most influential writers and leaders of the Jewish middle ages: Saadya Gaon, Yehuda Halevi, Moses Maimonides (Rambam), and Nachmanides (Ramban). Saadya and Rambam were rationalists who believed in the ultimate importance of reason and its relevance to religion and to Judaism. Halevi, the poet and thinker, taught that while reason is important and useful, it is not essential for achieving the ultimate goal and purpose of religion. The Ramban, a great Jewish thinker, was a mystic, rationalist, leader, poet and defender of Judaism. He tried to take a middle course. The course will address how these individuals functioned as leaders and how their overall understanding of Judaism affected their approach to community and leadership.

Back to top
         
LITURGY
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Liturgy of the Three Festivals
Syllabus 

CG LITGY 592

Blank T, 11:15 am-1:15 pm 3

This course is a study of some of the liturgies unique to the Three Festivals. We will focus on the fourth b’rakhah of the Amidah; common piyyutim; Hallel; and the Haggadah. We will use three approaches. The first is historical, considering the text as recorded in rabbinic sources, noting chronological development. Secondly, we will observe literary features, looking at style, theme, and use of language. Finally, we will analyze the theological message. Each of these approaches (or a combination of them) can be further explored in the student's written work

Back to top


 




MUSIC
         

COURSE NAME

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Voice Lessons 

CG MUSIC 200

Staff Private lessons 1 

Private lessons in singing with emphasis is on understanding the working of the vocal mechanism, maximizing the potential of the individual singer, learning to be an effective vocal teacher, and preparing the student to be an inspiring performer. Students will be taught how to use correct technique while singing a variety of different styles of music. Students will be required to participate in a studio recital once each semester and to memorize the music that is being performed. To adjudicate progress, students will also be required to sing in Vocal Boards, performing a liturgical selection either from memory or from the Hebrew text, and a secular piece from memory from repertoire to be approved in advance. Students in the music programs will be required repeat this course for credit each semester.

Master Class in Song Performance
Syllabus 

CE MUSIC 545

Torgove & Lieberman M, 2:15-4:15 pm

This course helps students to make the connection between performance and analysis. Students learn the scope of the repertoire, analyze text and music, and investigate the relation of the composition to its context (historical, cultural and/or liturgical). Students then perform the songs and receive coaching and critique from faculty. Repertoire includes Jewish art songs, artful arrangements of folk songs, Jewish musical theater (popular and operatic), and classic hazzanut. Prerequisite: Vocal Performance/Coaching

Kol Arev Workshop

CG MUSIC 305 Lieberman M, 4:30-6:30 pm 1

This course is for students who have successfully auditioned for and who will serve as members of Kol Arev, the Hebrew College Choir, during the academic year. Students in the music programs may repeat this course for credit each semester.

Choir

CG MUSIC 546

Lieberman

N/A

1

Students sing or serve as conducting interns in a choir specializing in Jewish repertoire. Participation must be approved in advance with the choir coordinator. Students in the music programs may repeat this course for credit each semester.

Senior Recital

CG MUSIC 905

Staff

Private lessons

1

Private lessons in singing with emphasis on preparing the student for the senior recital, this course will be taken instead of voice lessons during final two semesters before graduation. Students in the music programs may repeat this course for credit each semester of their final year.

Back to top
         
PARDES
         

The following courses are offered to students enrolled in the Pardes Educators Program only.

COURSE NAME

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Teaching and Studying the Bible: Challenges and Directions
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 617

M. Frankel

N/A

3
(Cohorts 14 and 15) 

This course will explore the complexities of teaching and studying the Biblical text in the 21stcentury, as seen through the lenses of contemporary thinkers and educators, biblical scholars and teachers. Traditional commentary and modern scholarship, rabbinic Midrash and personal interpretation, sacred legacy and moral deliberation are some of the issues that will inform our discussion. Biblical texts representing all genres of Scriptures (narrative; law; wisdom; poetry; prophecy and history) will serve as foci for the greater part of the semester. Participants will be required to work on a particular Biblical text, presenting both their personal study and teaching of that text to fellow participants. A final written project which integrates the application of principles learned is to be submitted at the end of term.

Art of Teaching
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 615

Grumet

N/A

3
(Cohort 15) 

This course focuses on the basics of planning and delivering effective lessons: establishing goals, maintaining the focus of the class, enduring understandings, discovery learning, essential questions, lesson planning, unit planning, formulating and reformulating questions, motivation, closure, homework and testing. Considerable attention is paid to applying basic principles of general education to the Jewish studies classroom, particularly in the day school setting.

Art of Learning
Syllabus   

CG EDUC 616 Wall N/A

3
(Cohort 14) 

This course focuses on various factors that influence a person's ability to learn: multiple intelligences, diverse learning styles/patterns, socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, and overall motivation. Theories are applied to helping learners more effectively through clear instructions, assessments, rubrics and differentiation in the classroom. While this course is designed primarily for day school teachers, concerns of teachers in any setting will be addressed. Reflection on ourselves as learners is an important element throughout the course.

 
Back to top
         
RABBINICS
         

COURSE NAME

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Introduction to Mishnah
Syllabus 

CG RAB 513

Leader

Tu, Th; 11:30 am-1 pm

4

This course is an intensive introduction to the form and content of the Mishnah, the first code of rabbinic law. Students will gain familiarity with classical rabbinic syntax, key concepts, and frequent forms of rabbinic teachings, building a foundation for further study of rabbinic literature. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV

Readings in Masechet Berakhot: Striving for Community and Kavod in Ancient Judaism
Syllabus 

CG RAB 552 Spitzer Online 4

The Rabbis describe the period before the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem as a time of “causeless hatred” between different sects of the Jewish people. We will explore how Rabbinic Judaism after the destruction tried to establish a community committed to Kavod as a primary value while at the same time balancing the values of dignity and community against other Jewish values. We will explore a variety of rabbinic texts, primarily from the first three chapters of tractate Berakhot in the Mishnah and the Babylonian Talmud with parallels from the Tosefta and the Talmud of the Land of Israel. Throughout, we will focus on the various ways the Rabbis use narratives alongside legal texts in order to create a complex conversation with the reader. Texts will be studied in Hebrew and in English. This course will also have a one hour hevruta session each week where students will be paired off for real-time study of texts related to the course. The instructor will be available during parts of these sessions for guidance and instruction. Students may use this course to fulfill their Hebrew language text requirement.

Back to top