Fall 2017 Courses

Fall Session Dates: September 11 through December 22, 2017

Courses may be available as a credit-bearing course or a non-credit bearing course. There is a difference in the courses numbers for credit and non-credit courses. Be sure to register using the correct course number. You will be charged according to your registration.

Community Education Courses can be found in a separate listing and will have a different pricing structure.


SHOOLMAN GRADUATE SCHOOL OF JEWISH EDUCATION
AND JEWISH STUDIES
 

JEWISH STUDIES

 


LANGUAGE COURSES

SCHOOL OF JEWISH MUSIC

COMMUNITY EDUCATION COURSES

 

SHOOLMAN GRADUATE SCHOOL OF JEWISH EDUCATION & JEWISH STUDIES

 

EDUCATION

                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew in Jewish Education
Shiri Katz-Gershon
CG-EDUC-584-W1
3 Graduate Credits
Online

Hebrew in Jewish Education
 Shiri Katz-Gershon
CG-EDUC-584-AU
Non-Credit Only
Online
Community Education Course

 

 

This course examines the theoretical Issues in Language Acquisition and application to teaching Hebrew as a second language in childhood. Decades of worldwide research in language acquisition recognizes childhood second-language acquisition not just as an end — seeing the world with a second set of eyes — but also as a means for cognitive and emotional growth. Teaching Hebrew in early childhood (0-8) opens a door for cultural and communal connections, as well as enhances cognition by strengthening mental functions such as working memory and phonological segmentation. In this course, we will examine debates in language acquisition relevant to teaching Hebrew in different settings. In each of these issues, we will explore a variety of solutions, some that were the common practice for decades and some newer. For each theoretical question, students will take a stand among the viewpoints and then learn to recognize, design, and implement applicable methodologies, activities. Some of the questions that will drive our work are: Which language elements should be emphasized in teaching a second language in different age groups; Why and how can we best teach Hebrew as a second language to children with language-based learning difficulties; When and how to teach literacy; and How can parents play a role in teaching Hebrew by incorporating it into family life?


                                Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Teaching Rabbinic Literature
Neil Janes
CG-EDUC-592-W1
3 graduate credits
Online
 

Teaching Rabbinic Literature
Neil Janes
CG-EDUC-592-NC
3 non-credits
Online 

 

This course fulfills a pedagogic application course requirement

This course in textual teaching explores the relationship between knowledge of rabbinic literature and teaching the texts of our tradition. We will explore a number of domains of teaching rabbinic literature and by doing so offer a variety of pedagogies of text teaching. The teaching of rabbinic literature is a spiritual practice that combines deep insight into the human mind and social condition with a thrilling journey into the historical development of Jewish thought. This course fulfills a pedagogic application course requirement.

 

                                Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Models of Teaching
Susie Rodenstein
CG-EDUC-601-C1
3 graduate credits
On Campus, Wednesdays 3:30 pm-5:30 pm

Models of Teaching
Susie Rodenstein
CG-EDUC-601-NC
3 non-credits
On Campus, Wednesdays 3:30 pm-5:30 pm 

 

 

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.

                                Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Models of Teaching
Susie Rodenstein
CG-EDUC-601-W1
3 graduate credits
Online
 

Models of Teaching
Susie Rodenstein
CG-EDUC-601-N2
3 non-credits
Online

 

 

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.
 


                                Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Designing Diverse Learning Experiences
Ariel Margolis
CG-EDUC-633-W1
3 graduate credits
Online
 

Designing Diverse Learning Experiences
Ariel Margolis
CG-EDUC-633-NC
3 non-credits
Online

 

This course fulfills a Special Education requirement

“Ok now, teach!” First year teachers still hear on the first day of school (or even better, to a student teacher who is subbing for the first time). Yet, what does it mean to teach? How does one teach? What is the art behind the science of teaching? In this course, we will journey through the world of designing learning experiences to meet the needs of neurodiverse learners with and without Special Needs and those identified with physical disabilities. We will stop to study the four researched based methods to help answer the question what does it mean to teach? This course fulfills a Special Education requirement.


                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Human Development
TBA
CG-EDUC-802-C1
3 graduate credits
On Campus, Fridays, 9:15 – 11:15 am
 

Human Development
TBA
CG-EDUC-802-NC
3 non-credits
On Campus, Fridays, 9:15 – 11:15 am

 

 

This course explores the relationship between human development and a lifelong trajectory of Jewish growth and learning. By exploring various developmental theories, including cognitive, psychosocial, and moral development, students will gain a deeper understanding of the developmental needs of, challenges facing, and opportunities for learners from early childhood through adulthood. Over the course of the semester students will both analyze and design Jewish educational programs that address learners’ developmental needs.


                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Human Development
TBA
CG-EDUC-802-W1
3 graduate credits
Online
 

Human Development
TBA
CG-EDUC-802-N2
3 non-credits
Online

 

 

This course explores the relationship between human development and a lifelong trajectory of Jewish growth and learning. By exploring various developmental theories, including cognitive, psychosocial, and moral development, students will gain a deeper understanding of the developmental needs of, challenges facing, and opportunities for learners from early childhood through adulthood. Over the course of the semester students will both analyze and design Jewish educational programs that address learners’ developmental needs.

 

IFJE Program:

                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Biblical, Rabbinic & Contemporary Perspectives on Intermarriage and Conversion
Ilan Fuchs
CG-EDUC-644-W1
3 graduate credits
Online
Biblical, Rabbinic & Contemporary Perspectives on Intermarriage and Conversion
Ilan Fuchs
CG-EDUC-644-AU
Non-Credit Only
Online
Community Education Course

 

 

Intermarriage and conversion present unique challenges to Jewish movements. This course familiarizes students with textual and theological perspectives about relationships as described in the biblical literature, and between contemporary Jews and people of other faith backgrounds. It includes critical reading and analysis about matrilineal and patrilineal descent; rabbinic officiation at interfaith weddings; matriculation and graduation of clergy, and Jewish identity. It explores the varied paths to conversion and categories of status according to different branches of Judaism, acquainting students with the theories and applications of terms such as “fellow travelers,” cultural affirmation, and halakhic Jews-by-choice.


Pardes Educators Program: 

Pedagogy II Developing as an Effective Teacher
Alex Sinclair
CG-EDUC-616-P1
3 graduate credits
Online, Begins August 30, 2017
Open to Pardes Educator Students Only

 
This course focuses on various factors that influence a person's ability to learn: multiple intelligences, diverse learning styles/patterns, socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, and overall motivation. Theories are applied to helping learners more effectively through clear instructions, assessments, rubrics and differentiation in the classroom. While this course is designed primarily for day school teachers, concerns of teachers in any setting will be addressed. Reflection on ourselves as learners is an important element throughout the course. (Open to Pardes Educator Students Only)


Jewish Educational Leadership Program:  

Curriculum Development and Ethics
Jeffrey Schein
ED-JLS-905-W1
3 graduate credits
Online
Open only to those in the Jewish Educational Leadership program.

A methodological key to this course is the work on “assumption-hunting” of Dr. Stephen Brookfield, the adult learning theorist. Working from the “assumption” that key curricular approaches and documents only partially make clear their epistemological, ethical, and educational foundations the course begins with an exploration of two thoroughly modern constructions of curriculum:  Joseph Schwab and Ralph Tyler. Participants will begin to view those theories from the rich perspectives of “post-modernity” in terms of changing views of the nature of knowledge, community, and dialogue. The third step of this curricular investigation will be an in depth of analysis of the curricular approaches of Mordecai Kaplan and Michael Rosenak. As part of the journey students will examine various curricular documents presently being utilized in contemporary Jewish education.


EDUCATION FIELD EXPERIENCES 

Education Practicum
Susan Morrel
CG-EDUC-600-C1
Non-Credit
Full Year: September 11, 2017 through May 18, 2018
Requirement: Student must be concurrently enrolled in Models of Teachings

Students with little or no education experience will participate in this teaching practicum to prepare them for upcoming field experience and lay the groundwork for success in their education careers. The goal of the practicum is to prepare students to move more easily, with new skills and confidence into the supervised field experience. The practicum gives students an opportunity to spend 3-5 hours per week for an academic year, observing educators, participating as much as possible in the educational setting and reflecting on what they are observing and experiencing. Students will be expected to complete the practicum when they are enrolled in Models of Teaching. When possible, assignments from the course will be carried out in the practicum site. Practicum must be approved by Director of Field Experiences.

Field Experience I
Susan Morrel
CG-EDUC-915-C1
1 graduate credit
Full Year: September 11, 2017 through May 18, 2018
Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education CG-Educ-601

Supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week over two semesters is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All field experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education CG-Educ-601

Field Experience II
Susan Morrel
CG-EDUC-916-C1
1 graduate credit
Full Year: September 11, 2017 through May 18, 201
Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education and Field Experience I

Supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required over two semesters. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All field experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education and Field Experience I

Supervised Field Experience: Special Education
Susan Morrel
CG-EDUC-924-C1
1 graduate credit
Full Year: September 11, 2017 through May 18, 2018

This course is a full academic year-long supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, camp, etc.) serving students with a variety of special needs. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position could be the basis for the experience with a focus on expanding the role to include a wide range of skills. All experiences must be approved by the Director of Field Experiences.

Supervised Field Experience: Early Childhood Education I
Susan Morrel
CG-EDUC-926-C1
1 graduate credit
Full Year: September 11, 2017 through May 18, 2018
Prerequisite: Certificate in Early Childhood Jewish Education (or near completion of)

Full academic year-long experience may include a mentoring relationship and/or arranged group visits to a variety of early childhood settings. Students will keep a journal to focus on observation, reflection and application. All experiences will be coordinated by the Director of Field Experiences. Prerequisite: Certificate in Early Childhood Jewish Education (or near completion of)

Supervised Field Experience: Early Childhood Education II
Susan Morrel
CG-EDUC-927-C1
1 graduate credit
Full Year: September 11, 2017 through May 18, 2018
Prerequisite: EDUC 926 Supervised Field Experience in Early Childhood I

Full academic year supervised field experience in an early childhood Jewish setting. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be designed to meet the professional needs of students. Focus on application and integration of expanded knowledge. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. All experiences must be approved by the Director of Field Experiences. Prerequisite: EDUC 926 Supervised Field Experience in Early Childhood I

GRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINARS

Graduate Research Seminar for MJE Students
Deborah Skolnick Einhorn
CG-EDUC-707-H1
1 graduate credit
Hybrid – FULL YEAR: Sept 11, 2017 through May 18, 2018
Tuesdays, monthly at 6:30pm EST (dates TBA)
Open to graduating students in the Masters of Jewish Education program only

This research seminar is the culmination of a student's years of study at Hebrew College and provides students with the opportunity to integrate their learning of Judaic texts with educational theories and practice. The final project allows students to further investigate a topic that intrigues them and relates to their work. Throughout the yearlong project, students will be guided by the seminar instructors, a faculty adviser of their choosing and by the seminar community itself. The project is then submitted as a bound written paper and presented orally at an end-of-year day of celebration. This course is yearlong, ending in May. This version of the seminar is for Masters in Jewish Education students.

 Graduate Research Seminar for MJEJS Students
Deborah Skolnick Einhorn
CG-EDUC-715-H1
2 graduate credits
Hybrid – FULL YEAR: Sept 11, 2017 through May 18, 2018
Tuesdays, monthly at 6:30pm EST (dates TBA)
Open to graduating students in the dual degree program (MJEJS) only
 

This research seminar is the culmination of a student's years of study at Hebrew College and provides students with the opportunity to integrate their learning of Judaic texts with educational theories and practice. The final project allows students to further investigate a topic that intrigues them and relates to their work. Throughout the yearlong project, students will be guided by the seminar instructors, a faculty adviser of their choosing and by the seminar community itself. The project is then submitted as a bound written paper and presented orally at an end-of-year day of celebration. This course is yearlong, ending in May. This is for graduating students taking a dual degree in Jewish Education and Jewish Studies.

     

JEWISH STUDIES

BIBLE

Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

 

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature I
David Frankel
CG-BIBLE-502A-C1
3 graduate credits
Thursdays, 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature I
David Frankel
CG-BIBLE-502A-NC
3 non-credits
Thursdays, 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 4

This course will focus on Biblical narrative and legal discourse. The course will cover the arc of biblical history and historiography, examining prose selections from the Torah, as well as the historical books: Joshua, Judges, Samuel I and II, and Kings I and II. Several sessions will also focus on legal, prescriptive and proscriptive material, including ritual and civil law. Particular attention is paid to understanding of the Hebrew text, and to the linguistic and literary characteristics of the different genres. First part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4

 

INTERDISCIPLINARY
                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Sacred Beginnings: An Introduction to Jewish Mysticism and Spirituality
Aubrey Glazer 
CG-INTD-511-W1
3 graduate credits
Online   

Sacred Beginnings: An Introduction to Jewish Mysticism and Spirituality
Aubrey Glazer
CG-INTD-511-NC
3 non-credits
Online

 

 

Touching God—this is the yearning for a direct, immediate experience of the divine presence, a longing to grasp the ineffable mysteries of the human soul and know the inner dynamics of the divine realm. This course will introduce students to the major texts and core ideas of Jewish mysticism and spirituality, tracking their development inn many different forms across the centuries, from the Hebrew Bible to the present day. By examining and reflecting upon the written record of mystical experience, we will consider how the kabbalistic texts are akin to poems that not only depict a mystical process but produce it.

This course assumes no prior background. All readings will be made available in English. Students with some knowledge of the material, however, are invited to challenge themselves with the “optional” and “advanced” readings of sources, both primary and secondary.

     

                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Inner Life & Social Justice Activism
David Jaffe
CG-INTD-561-W1
3 graduate credits
Online 

Inner Life & Social Justice Activism
David Jaffe
CG-INTD-561-AU
Non-Credit Only
Online
Community Education Course

 

 

Drawing on Musar and Chassidic literature and the concept of tikkun hamiddot (personal ethical and spiritual development), this course will focus on the relationship between personal spirituality and strategies for social justice organizing and advocacy for transformative social change. Some of the specific areas of exploration will include motivation and self-interest, choice, humility and trust.

 

                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Introduction to Mishnah
Ebn Leader
CG-RAB-513-C1
4 graduate credits
Wednesdays, 10:45am – 12:30 pm and Fridays, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Introduction to Mishnah
Ebn Leader
CG-RAB-513-NC
4 non-creditsly
Wednesdays, 10:45am – 12:30 pm and Fridays, 11:30 am – 1:00 p

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 4

This course is an intensive introduction to the form and content of the Mishnah, the first code of rabbinic law. Students will gain familiarity with classical rabbinic syntax, key concepts, and frequent forms of rabbinic teachings, building a foundation for further study of rabbinic literature. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4

JEWISH THOUGHT

                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Reading Maimonides
Barry Mesch

CG-JTHT-528-W1 
4 graduate credits
Online
 

Reading Maimonides
Barry Mesch
CG-JTHT-528-NC
4 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above
 

 

 

This course will consider the writings of one of the most prolific and influential Jewish figures of all time. Moses ben Maimon was born in Spain in the 12th century, fled to Palestine and then Egypt where he lived for most of his life. His writings deal with almost every aspect of Jewish life with a particular focus on law and philosophy. We will be reading from his Guide of the Perplexed, Mishneh Torah, Introduction to the Mishnah, and the Introduction to the Tenth chapter of the Tractate of Sanhedrin (Perek Ha-Helek) along with short selections from his letters (igarot). The course will focus on Maimonides’ leadership, compassion, elitism, rationalism and ultimately, his view of Jewish life and faith. The course will include a Bet Midrash experience - once a week students will meet virtually through videochat in hevruta (partnership or small groups) to study the text synchronously together. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above.


LANGUAGE COURSES

On Campus

HEBREW & CULTURE: UNDERSTANDING TEXT SERIES- Fundamentals of Hebrew
UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL:
                                Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew Language & Culture 1: Understanding Texts
–HEBREW 1

Sigalit Davis
MG-HEBRW-120-C1
3 undergraduate credits
Thursdays, 4:30 – 6:45 pm

Hebrew Language & Culture 1: Understanding Texts –HEBREW 1
Sigalit Davis
MG-HEBRW-120-NC
3 non-credits
Thursdays, 4:30 – 6:45 pm 

 

 

In this fundamental course, students will learn the basic Hebrew vocabulary and grammar needed for speaking, decoding, reading, and comprehending authentic Hebrew texts—modern to ancient. The course begins with an introduction to the Hebrew alphabet and vowel system through songs, dialogues, and stories. There will be some in-class conversation in Hebrew; however, the emphasis will be on developing reading comprehension skills. Please note: Study time outside the classroom will be expected.


GRADUATE LEVEL:

Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew Language & Culture, “Standing at Sinai”
Sigalit Davis
MG-HEBRW-522-C1
3graduate credits
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm

Hebrew Language & Culture, “Standing at Sinai”
Sigalit Davis
MG-HEBRW-522-NC
3 non-credits
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or equivalent knowledge 

 

 

Using a unique approach to learning Hebrew through historical layers via the diverse genres and methodologies in Jewish and Israeli culture, teachings and humor, this advanced course will draw on a variety of Hebrew texts from a selection of original sources, including the Bible, Mishnah, Midrash, medieval texts, Hasidic tales and Modern Hebrew. The anthology of readings will include items from the Book of Exodus, Ethics of Our Fathers, the works of Maimonides, Rambam, Yehuda HaLevi, Martin Buber, and the writings from the Modern Hebrew renaissance to date (i.e., from Bialik to Amos Oz, Etgar Keret Meir Shalev & more.) A comparative and analytical approach to learning Hebrew, with greater vocabulary and encompassing grammar concepts, will be fully integrated into this literature-oriented course. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or equivalent knowledge.

Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

 

Israel Society Language & Culture: From 1920 through present day through music
Sigalit Davis
MG-HEBRW-525-C1
2 non-credits
Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Israel Society Language & Culture: From 1920 through present day through music
Sigalit Davis
MG-HEBRW-525-NC
2 non-credits
Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:30 pm 

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or equivalent knowledge

Travel back to the 1920s to pre-Israel by examining the music and lyrics of the popular songs at that time, and from the perspective of those songs, experience the historical events as they were unfolding. From the 1920s, we’ll move forward in time and events up to today — examining and immersing ourselves in the songs of each time period or event. These songs will serve as a unique lens into history-in-the-making, and provide us with a closer, more personal look at those events and their impact on Israelis. Through our exploration of the music and the lyrics “of the day,” we’ll also experience Hebrew’s continuing revitalization and adaption, and witness Israel’s ever-evolving multi-ethnic culture. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or equivalent knowledge

                            Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 5
Adva Alpert

CG-HEBRW-205-C1
4 graduate credits
Mon., Tues, & Thurs; 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Hebrew 5                            
Adva Alpert
CG-HEBRW-205-NC
4 non-credits
Mon., Tues, & Thurs; 10:00 am – 11:30 am

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 4.

Hebrew 5 and 6 constitute a two-semester sequence intended to deepen and build the student’s knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, with an emphasis on active use of the language in speech and writing. In preparation in particular for subsequent study of classical Hebrew by students in the programs of the Hebrew College School of Jewish Music and Rabbinical School and their work with classical texts, it is the goal of this course to provide the students with a comfort and intuitive familiarity with Hebrew that will facilitate that work. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4.

 

Ulpan Hebrew on Campus
September 15, 2017 through December 22, 2017
All courses listed below are offered non-credit.
Ulpan for credit is offered by special permission.
See the Ulpan webpage for more information including credit pricing

 

Ulpan Level Classes meeting
once a week
Classes meeting
twice a week
Level 1
(beginner)
Tue 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Sun 2:30 - 5:30 pm
Monday & Wednesday, 9:30 - 11:20 am
Monday & Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:20 pm
Level 2
(mid-beginner)
Tue 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Fri 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Sun 2:30 - 5:30 pm
Monday & Wednesday, 9:30 - 11:20 am
Monday & Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:20 pm
Level 3
(advanced beginner)
Tue 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Fri 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Sun 2:30 - 5:30 pm
Monday & Wednesday, 9:30 - 11:20 am
Monday & Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:20 pm
Level 4
(low intermediate)
Tue 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Fri 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Monday & Wednesday, 9:30 - 11:20 am
Monday & Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:20 pm
Level 5
(mid-intermediate)
Tue 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
 Fri 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Monday & Wednesday, 9:30 - 11:20 am
Monday & Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:20 pm
Level 6
(high intermediate)
Tue 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Fri 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Monday & Wednesday, 9:30 - 11:20 am
Monday & Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:20 pm
Level 7
(low advanced)
Tue 6:30 - 9:30 pm
Fri 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Monday & Wednesday, 9:30 - 11:20 am
Monday & Wednesday, 6:30 - 8:20 pm
Level 8/9
(mid-advanced)
Wed 10 am - 1pm
Fri 9:30 am - 12:30 pm
Monday & Wednesday, 9:30 - 11:20 am

 

 

HEBREW ONLINE 
All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.
All Hebrew Online courses are offered September 11 through December 22, 2017
Students can opt for a fast track that completes a level in a semester (Levels 1, 2, 3 & 4) or a regular track that completes the level in two semesters (Levels 1A/B, 2A/B, 3A/B, or 4A/B).
All Hebrew-Online courses are undergraduate level courses.

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language
Shir Twersky
CU-HEBRW-015-NC
Non-credit only
Offered online only
Students should prepare for this course by learning the Hebrew alphabet.

The introductory online Hebrew course is designed to commence students’ natural exposure to
Hebrew using the proficiency method of learning Hebrew emphasizing reading, speaking, comprehension and writing. Students should prepare for this course by learning the Hebrew alphabet. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce students to authentic Hebrew language materials including videos, texts, music etc. Students use online applications such as wizer to respond to real life situations, demonstrating their growing proficiency in the four domains of natural language acquisition. Assessment tools are built into the platform allowing students to see evidence of their own progress as well as instructor feedback. In addition, a weekly online face-to-face oral Hebrew session is hosted by the instructor for the class group and is a requirement of the course.

 

                              Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew Level 1 (Novice)
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-115-W1  
4 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew Level 1 (Novice)                           
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-115-NC
4 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew Level 1 (Fast Track) emphasizes immersion in the language for the purpose of absorbing and acquiring the language naturally. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce students to authentic Hebrew language materials including videos, music, poetry, texts etc. Students use online applications such as wizer to respond to real life situations and scenarios in Hebrew demonstrating growing proficiency in reading, speaking, comprehension and writing. Materials used develop knowledge of contemporary Israeli culture as well as Jewish life. Assessment tools are built into the platform allowing students to see evidence of their own progress. In addition, a weekly online face-to-face oral Hebrew session is hosted by the instructor for the class group and is a requirement of the course. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.


                                Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew Level 1A (Novice)
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-115A-W1 
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew Level 1A (Novice)                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-115A-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew Level 1A emphasizes immersion in the language for the purpose of absorbing and acquiring the language naturally. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce students to authentic Hebrew language materials including videos, music, poetry, texts etc. Students use online applications such as wizer to respond to real life situations and scenarios in Hebrew demonstrating growing proficiency in reading, speaking, comprehension and writing. Materials used develop knowledge of contemporary Israeli culture as well as Jewish life. Assessment tools are built into the platform allowing students to see evidence of their own progress. In addition, a weekly online face-to-face oral Hebrew session is hosted by the instructor for the class group and is a requirement of the course. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

 

                             Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew Level 1B (Mid-Novice)
Moriyah Green
 
CU-HEBRW-115B-W1 
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew Level 1B (Mid-Novice)                                 
Moriyah Green
CU-HEBRW-115B-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew1A or placement test.

Hebrew Level 1B emphasizes immersion in the language for the purpose of absorbing and acquiring the language naturally. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce students to authentic Hebrew language materials including videos, music, poetry, texts etc. Students use online applications such as wizer to respond to real life situations and scenarios in Hebrew demonstrating growing proficiency in reading, speaking, comprehension and writing. Materials used develop knowledge of contemporary Israeli culture as well as Jewish life. Assessment tools are built into the platform allowing students to see evidence of their own progress. In addition, a weekly online face-to-face oral Hebrew session is hosted by the instructor for the class group and is a requirement of the course.

 

Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

 

Hebrew 2
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-210-W1
4 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 2
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-210-NC
4 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew Levels 2, 3, & 4 (Fast Track) emphasize reading, writing, speaking and comprehension. The textbook Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch) is used, completing volume 1 and volume II by the end of level 4. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce the exercises and drills for mastery of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. Students complete the work in weekly assignments and submit responses to the instructor. In addition, the instructor hosts a weekly face-to-face online Hebrew conversation group for students at the same level. Students can opt for a fast track that completes a level in a semester or a regular track that completes the level in two semesters.

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Hebrew II covers Lessons 15–28 in the textbook

 

                            Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 2A
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-211A-W1
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 2A                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-211A-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.

Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 2B
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-211B-W1
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 2B
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-211B-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only 

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.

Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 3
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-310-W1
4 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 3
Michal Levy
MG-HEBRW-120-NC
4 non-credits
Offered online only 

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew Levels 2, 3, & 4 (Fast Track) emphasize reading, writing, speaking and comprehension. The textbook Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch) is used, completing volume 1 and volume II by the end of level 4. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce the exercises and drills for mastery of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. Students complete the work in weekly assignments and submit responses to the instructor. In addition, the instructor hosts a weekly face-to-face online Hebrew conversation group for students at the same level. Students can opt for a fast track that completes a level in a semester or a regular track that completes the level in two semesters.

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew III covers Lessons 1-8 in the textbook.

                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 3A
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-311A-W1
2 undergraduate credit
Offered online only

Hebrew 3A                    
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-311A-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.


This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 3B
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-311B-W1 
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 3B                                 
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-311B-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

                             Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 4
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-410-W1
4 undergraduate credit
Offered online only

Hebrew 4                            
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-410-NC
4 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.t.

Hebrew Levels 2, 3, & 4 (Fast Track) emphasize reading, writing, speaking and comprehension. The textbook Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch) is used, completing volume 1 and volume II by the end of level 4. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce the exercises and drills for mastery of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. Students complete the work in weekly assignments and submit responses to the instructor. In addition, the instructor hosts a weekly face-to-face online Hebrew conversation group for students at the same level. Students can opt for a fast track that completes a level in a semester or a regular track that completes the level in two semesters.

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew III covers Lessons 9-16 in the textbook.

                              Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 4A
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-411A-W1 
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 4A                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-411A-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only 

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Hebrew 4B
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-411B-W1    
2 undergraduate credi
Offered online only

Hebrew 4B                          
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-411B-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

 

SCHOOL OF JEWISH MUSIC


CANTORIAL 

                              Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

How to Chant Torah
Neil Schwartz

CG-CANTR-528-W1 
3 graduate credits
Online
 

How to Chant Torah
Neil Schwartz
CG-CANTR-528-AU
3 non-credits
Online
Community Education Course 

 

Prerequisite: facility with reading Hebrew

In this online course, students learn the history and analysis of the punctuation system underlying the chanting of the Hebrew Bible. Through audio coaching, students learn a traditional Ashkenazic mode for the public cantillation of the Torah and correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew. Prerequisite: facility with reading Hebrew. Cantorial students may audit only; will not count for graduate credit for master's students in the cantorial program.

                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Cantillation for Festivals, Eicha and Esther
Joshua Jacobson

CG-CANTR-537-C1
3 graduate credits
Tuesdays, 11:15 am – 1:15 pm    Cantillation for Festivals, Eicha and Esther

Cantillation 1
Joshua Jacobson
CG-CANTR-537-NC
3 non-credits
Tuesdays, 11:15 am – 1:15 pm 

 

Prerequisite: Cantillation 1 or permission from the instructor

Instruction will be given in the chanting of Ruth, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Esther, and Lamentations. Emphasis is on expressive reading based on a deep understanding of both the text and the musical system.  Prerequisite: Cantillation 1 or permission from the instructor
 


                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

Yom Kippur Nusach
Brian Mayer

CG-CANTR-554-C1 
3 graduate credits
Wednesdays, 11:15 am – 1:15 pm

Yom Kippur Nusach
Brian Mayer
CG-CANTR-554-NC
3 non-credits
Wednesdays, 11:15 am – 1:15 pm

 

Prerequisites: Rosh Hashanah Nusach 1 and 2

Students receive instruction on the modes and motifs of Yom Kippur and how to lead services using motivic improvisation within the established framework of received Ashkenazic tradition. Students also learn appropriate congregational melodies. Students are also introduced to selected cantorial recitatives, and coached on their authentic rendering. Prerequisites: Rosh Hashanah Nusach 1 and 2.

Cantorial Coaching
CG-CANTR-579-C1
1 graduate credit
Available on for credit only
Enrollment: limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the SJM programs or by permission of the SJM

This course provides coaching by a practicing cantor who will guide the student according to his or her individual needs. Goals of coaching are to increase facility with prayer leading and to improve vocal and musical interpretations of selected repertoire as pertains to the Jewish Life Cycle. The student will be evaluated on the benchmark requirements by the third year of residency to ascertain proficiency. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the SJM program or by permission of the SJM. May be repeated for credit.


Cantorial Internship 1
Instructor to be assigned for each student
CE-CANTR-921-C1

1 graduate credit

Students spend a semester on location in a synagogue, observing a practicing cantor. The on-site cantor meets with and coaches the student in the practical application of skills learned in the classroom. Open to COSEL students only


Cantorial Internship 2
Instructor to be assigned for each student
CE-CANTR-922-C1

1 graduate credit

Prerequisite: Cantorial Internship 1

Students spend a semester on location in a synagogue, working with a practicing cantor, with opportunities for leading services and or various teaching situations. The on-site cantor meets with and coaches the student in the practical application of skills learned in the classroom.
Prerequisite: Cantorial Internship 1.  Open to COSEL students only

Preparation for Comprehensive Exams
Instructor to be assigned for each student
CE-CANTR-997-C1

1 graduate credit

Open only to COSEL Students in their final year

This course is open to cantorial students only in their final year before ordination and is intended for review and completion of all comprehensive exams required in either Nusach or Cantillation. All exams must be completed by April 1st. Enrollment is with permission of the Dean of the School of Jewish Music. Open only to COSEL Students in their final year.


MUSIC 

Voice Lessons
Instructor to be assigned for each student
CG-MUSIC-200-C1

1 graduate credit
Available on a for-credit basis only.
Enrollment by non-SJM degree students is with permission from the Head of Vocal Arts, and will require payment of a studio fee

Private lessons in singing. Emphasis is on understanding the working of the vocal mechanism, maximizing the potential of the individual singer, learning to be an effective vocal teacher, and preparing the student to be an inspiring performer. Students will be taught how to use correct technique while singing a variety of different styles of music.  Students will be required to participate in a studio recital once each semester and to memorize the music that is being performed. To adjudicate progress, students will also be required to sing in Vocal Boards, performing a liturgical selection either from memory or from the Hebrew text, and a secular piece from memory from repertoire to be approved in advance. Enrollment by non-SJM degree students is with permission from the Head of Vocal Arts, and will require payment of a studio fee. May be repeated for credit.

 

Kol Arev Chamber Choir
Amy Lieberman
CG-MUSIC-305-NC
Available only for Non-Credit
Mondays, 4:30-6:30
 

This ensemble is open to students who have successfully auditioned for and who will serve as members of Kol Arev Chamber Ensemble during the academic year. Participation is required for students in the COSEL program.
 

Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

 

 

Jewish Music History 1
Judy Pinnolis
CG-MUSIC-505-C1
3 undergraduate credits
Tuesdays, 4:30 – 6:30 pm

Jewish Music History 1
Sigalit Davis
CG-MUSIC-505-NC
3 non-credits
Tuesdays, 4:30 – 6:30 pm 

 

Prerequisite: Ability to read music

This course provides a close look at the music of the Jewish people. Study involves modal and phrase analysis (and, where relevant, harmonic analysis) of traditional materials; historical analysis through close reading of primary sources; and functional analysis of attitudes and uses of Jewish music. Topics to be covered include analysis of how music is used by Jews, music in ancient Israel, traditional liturgical chant, rabbinical attitudes towards music, secular and paraliturgical folksongs and wedding music, and the beginnings of Jewish polyphony in the Italian Renaissance. Prerequisite: Ability to read music.

 

Jewish Art Song
Lynn Torgove and Amy Lieberman
CE-MUSIC-510-C1

3 graduate credits
Mondays, 2:15 – 4:15 pm
Open to COSEL students only
Enrollment by non-COSEL students is with permission from the instructor


This course helps students to make the connection between performance and analysis. Students learn the scope of the repertoire, analyze text and music, and investigate the relation of the composition to its context (historical, cultural and/or liturgical). Students then perform the songs and receive coaching and critique from faculty. Repertoire includes Jewish art songs, artful arrangements of folk songs, Jewish musical theater (popular and operatic), and classic hazzanut.
Open to COSEL students only. Enrollment by non-COSEL students is with permission from the instructor.


Senior Recital 
Instructor to be assigned for each student
CE-MUSIC-905-C1
1 graduate credit
Open only to COSEL students during final year

Private lessons in singing. Emphasis is on preparing the student for the senior recital. This course will be taken instead of voice lessons during final two semesters before graduation. May be repeated for credit.

 

Community Education Courses

 COMMUNITY EDUCATION COURSES

These courses are open to the general community as non-credit (audit) courses at a considerable tuition discount.
Only the Community Education Discount will apply to these courses.
The course number used when registering must end in AU. 
 

EDUCATION

Hebrew in Jewish Education
Shiri Katz-Gershon
CG-EDUC-584-AU
Non-Credit Only
Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm
Community Education Course

This course examines the theoretical Issues in Language Acquisition and application to teaching Hebrew as a second language in childhood. Decades of worldwide research in language acquisition recognizes childhood second-language acquisition not just as an end — seeing the world with a second set of eyes — but also as a means for cognitive and emotional growth. Teaching Hebrew in early childhood (0-8) opens a door for cultural and communal connections, as well as enhances cognition by strengthening mental functions such as working memory and phonological segmentation. In this course, we will examine debates in language acquisition relevant to teaching Hebrew in different settings. In each of these issues, we will explore a variety of solutions, some that were the common practice for decades and some newer. For each theoretical question, students will take a stand among the viewpoints and then learn to recognize, design, and implement applicable methodologies, activities. Some of the questions that will drive our work are: Which language elements should be emphasized in teaching a second language in different age groups; Why and how can we best teach Hebrew as a second language to children with language-based learning difficulties; When and how to teach literacy; and How can parents play a role in teaching Hebrew by incorporating it into family life?



Biblical, Rabbinic & Contemporary Perspectives on Intermarriage and Conversion
Ilan Fuchs
CG-EDUC-644-AU
Non-Credit Only
Online
Community Education Course

Intermarriage and conversion present unique challenges to Jewish movements. This course familiarizes students with textual and theological perspectives about relationships as described in the biblical literature, and between contemporary Jews and people of other faith backgrounds. It includes critical reading and analysis about matrilineal and patrilineal descent; rabbinic officiation at interfaith weddings; matriculation and graduation of clergy, and Jewish identity. It explores the varied paths to conversion and categories of status according to different branches of Judaism, acquainting students with the theories and applications of terms such as “fellow travelers,” cultural affirmation, and halakhic Jews-by-choice.

JEWISH STUDIES

Inner Life & Social Justice Activism
David Jaffe
CG-INTD-561-AU
Non-Credit Only
Online
Community Education Course

Drawing on Musar and Chassidic literature and the concept of tikkun hamiddot (personal ethical and spiritual development), this course will focus on the relationship between personal spirituality and strategies for social justice organizing and advocacy for transformative social change. Some of the specific areas of exploration will include motivation and self-interest, choice, humility and trust.

MUSIC

  Non-Credit Only

 

How to Chant Torah
Neil Schwartz

CG-CANTR-528-AU    
Non-Credit Only
Online
Community Education Course
Prerequisite: facility with reading Hebrew

 

 

In this online course, students learn the history and analysis of the punctuation system underlying the chanting of the Hebrew Bible. Through audio coaching, students learn a traditional Ashkenazic mode for the public cantillation of the Torah and correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew. Prerequisite: facility with reading Hebrew. Cantorial students may audit only; will not count for graduate credit for master's students in the cantorial program.

 

 

 

 

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