Fall 2015 Online Course Listings

 

CANTORIAL
How to Chant Haftarah and Esther CG CANTR 532
Online | 3 graduate credits  SyllabusSchwartz


This course gives details and background for chanting the Trope of Haftarah and Megillat Esther. Topics will include a brief review of Hebrew grammar needed for accurate pronunciation and the punctuation of phrases, standard Ashkenazic motifs for chanting Haftarah and Esther Trope, pedagogy issues and teaching techniques and an overview of the development and functions of the Tiberian Trope.

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EDUCATION
Models of Teaching (online) CG EDUC 601
Online | 3 graduate credits Rodenstein


In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter. 

Human Development and Learning (online) CG EDUC 802
Online | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Price


This course explores the relationship between human development and a lifelong trajectory of Jewish growth and learning. By exploring various developmental theories, including cognitive, psychosocial and moral development, students will gain a deeper understanding of the developmental needs of, challenges facing and opportunities for learners from early childhood through adulthood. Over the course of the semester, students will both analyze and design Jewish educational programs that address learners' developmental needs.

Hebrew for Early Childhood Education CG EDUC 534
Online | 3 graduate credits Davis


This course covers basic Hebrew vocabulary focusing on its application to the early childhood classroom. Integrating Hebrew into music, games, movement and stories is stressed. Theories of language acquisition in children as well as adults will be covered. Students are encouraged to use and practice Hebrew in the classroom. This course is exclusively for students pursuing a certificate or degree in Early Childhood Education.

Jewish Life and Values CG EDUC 625
Online | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Kaunfer


The purpose of this course is to engage you as educators with major concepts and values of Jewish life. The course will have a dual focus: content knowledge and pedagogic application. In studying each topic, you will be asked to consider both the concepts and sources of the topic, as well as how the topic can be taught and experienced by students in various educational settings. You will have opportunities to apply your learning to the age group that you teach or direct. We will study each area using classic texts along with modern commentaries and writings. Topics will include the Jewish life cycle (birth, adoption, bar-bat mitzvah, marriage, conversion, divorce, death); values such as tzedakah, relationship between parents and children, k'vod ha-beriyot, bikkur holim; and Jewish practice (kashrut, tallit and tefillin). This course fulfills a pedagogic application requirement.

Experiential Learning Online: The Jewish Court of All Time  CG EDUC 690
Online | 3 graduate credits Einhorn


In this course, students will explore the role of technology, online games and role play in experiential Jewish education. Interacting as mentors in the Jewish Court of All Time, a middle-school online history simulation in Jewish day schools, students will work to understand the online learning environment and philosophies for engaging students in "native" environments that potentially encourage deeper interactions and learning. At the same time, course readings, exercises and discussions will hone students' ability to leverage online experiential learning toward specific learning outcomes, while managing potential distractions, glitches and nonparticipation by the learners. The course will have implication for both online and in-person learning environments, as well as for multiple educational settings. This course fulfills a pedagogic application requirement.

Instructional Design I CG EDUC 630 
Online | 3 graduate credits Margolis 


This course will introduce students to five pedagogical and instructional strategies to meet diverse students' needs: Universal Design for Learning, Differentiated Instruction, Multiple Intelligences, SAMR and TPACK models that incorporate educational technology. With each strategy, two main focal points will be on curriculum design and teaching methodologies. By the end of the course, students will be able to answer: How does the teacher design curriculum to meet the needs of students with and without special needs? What teaching strategies can be employed to meet the needs of students with and without special needs? What special education practices have been accepted as good universal teaching practices? What roles can technology play in pedagogical practice? How are these strategies and practices used in a Jewish educational setting (day school, afternoon school, camp)? Students will discover, comprehend and apply the methodologies and strategies of each approach, enhance and practice the reflective process, develop skills for student driven collaborative and independent learning and familiarize themselves with various edtech tools and platforms. This course fulfills a special-education requirement.

Human Development and Learning CG EDUC 802
Online | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Price


Open only to Pardes Educators, Cohorts 15 and 16.

This course explores the relationship between human development and a lifelong trajectory of Jewish growth and learning. By exploring various developmental theories, including cognitive, psychosocial and moral development, students will gain a deeper understanding of the developmental needs of, challenges facing and opportunities for learners from early-childhood through adulthood. Over the course of the semester, students will both analyze and design Jewish educational programs that address learners' developmental needs.

Philosophies of Education and Leadership in Jewish Thought and Practice ED JLS 902
Online | 3 graduate credits  Shire


Open to JLDS students or by permission of the instructor only.

The work in this course is divided into two parts. In the first part, we will examine some important modern philosophers of Jewish education, in order to become familiar with some of the different approaches in this field and the purposes of Jewish education. In the second part, we will attempt to move from these more abstract levels of reflection to contemplate concrete areas and issues in contemporary Jewish education. This will give us a chance to explore how philosophical perspectives inform educational strategies and practices, whether explicitly or implicitly; it will also provide an opportunity for students to begin to spell out their own philosophical positions on real topics in day-to-day Jewish education, as they contemplate their educational leadership in these areas and challenges.

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HEBREW (ONLINE)


All classes require the purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.

All online Hebrew classes use the texbook "Ivrit Min Hahatchala" ("Hebrew from Scratch"), Vol. 1 or Vol. 2. See individual course descriptions.


Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language  CU HEBRW 010
Online | Noncredit only Levy


This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students work at their own pace, submitting oral and written homework, and taking online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala" ("Hebrew from Scratch"), the textbook used by Hebrew College's campus-based and online Hebrew-language programs. Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1. Mekhina will cover the introductory units of the textbook.

Hebrew I CU HEBRW 110
Online | 4 undergraduate credits Levy


This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement testTextbook: "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Hebrew 1 will cover Lessons 1–14 of the textbook.

Hebrew 1A CU HEBRW 111A
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy


This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7, of I "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew 1B CU HEBRW 111B
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy


This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1A or placement test.

Hebrew 2 CU HEBRW 210
Online | 4 undergraduate credits Levy


A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew 2A CU HEBRW 211A
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy


This course covers the first half of Hebrew 2, Lessons 15–21, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew 2B CU HEBRW 211B
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy


This course covers the second half of Hebrew 2, Lessons 22–28, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test. 

Hebrew 3 CU HEBRW 310
Online | 4 undergradute credits Levy


Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew 3A CU HEBRW 311A
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy


This course covers the first half of Hebrew 3, Lessons 1–4, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew 3B CU HEBRW 311B
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy


This course covers the second half of Hebrew 3, Lessons 5–8, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

Hebrew 4 CU HEBRW 410
Online | 4 undergraduate credits Levy


This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew 4A CU HEBRW 411A
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy


This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew 4B CU HEBRW 411B
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy


This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

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HISTORY
Text and Context: Biblical and Rabbinic Periods   CG HIST 541
Online | 3 graduate credits
Syllabus | Mesch


In this course, we will encounter the Tanakh and rabbinic literature, and the cultures and civilizations in which they developed. We will read substantial portions of original texts (in translation) along with key secondary sources to provide students with a framework through which they can gain understanding of the key issues and concepts that underlie these texts and their history. We will also be attentive to the variety of ways that the Bible and rabbinic literature are read and interpreted. There are no prerequisites for this class; it will be taught as an introductory course for graduate students and as an introduction to graduate work in Jewish studies.

The Eastern European Era CG HIST 533
Online | 3 graduate credits Liekis


The study of Eastern European Jewry has benefited from renewed interest and new capabilities following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the reemergence of the independent states of East-Central Europe. Conditions of censorship and restricted access have given way to new scholarly initiatives and renewed support. This course will focus on the following themes: the specific character of the Jewry of East-Central Europe including religious, cultural, intellectual, political and economic history; relations between Jews and non-Jews from the later 18th century under a variety of ruling empires up to recent developments of independence and the revival of Jewish life; and contemporary attempts to engage the Jewish past by both Jews and non-Jews and attempts to come to terms with the difficult legacy of the Holocaust. The course will also explore the nature of the archival resources now available for genealogical research in the context of gaining a deeper understanding of the social and personal history of the Jewish community.

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JEWISH THOUGHT
Core Issues in Jewish Thought (Hevruta course) CG JTHT 526
Online | 4 graduate credits Mesch


This course will deal with a set of central theological and philosophical issues that have engaged the attention of Jews from the earliest times up to today. These issues include God and God's relation to the world in general and to the Jews in particular, prophecy and revelation, free will and human responsibility and the program of evil, mitzvot (commandments), Jewish Peoplehood, Jews and non-Jews. We will first explore these issues in the early Jewish writings and then follow them from the rabbis to the medieval philosophers, and then on to the modern and post-modern writers. In this Hevruta text course, students will meet in real time via video for one hour a week to study the week's texts together.

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