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Spring 2014 Courses

View courses by discipline:

BibleCantorialEducationHebrew (on campus)Hebrew (online)HistoryInterdisciplinaryJewish ThoughtLiturgyMusicPardesRabbinicsUlpan

See the daily schedule

BIBLE
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature  

CG BIBLE 502B

Adelman

M, 11:30 am-1 pm

3

This course entails an introduction to the full complement of Biblical poetry, in its literary and historical context, and to modes of poetic interpretation and analysis. The course will cover selections from the Torah, Psalms, Proverbs, and the Book of Job, as well as selections from the Prophets such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah.  We will discuss poetry imbedded within narrative, genres of Prophetic writings, apocalyptic revelations, and wisdom literature. Second part of a two-semester sequence. Level: Mekorot 

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CANTORIAL
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

How to Lead High Holy Day Services
Syllabus 

CG CANTR 523

Schwartz

Online

3

This course provides students with the skills necessary to lead the traditional prayers of services of the high holidays. Students will explore the musical modes of Nusach HaTefillah that are chanted throughout these holidays, and apply those musical motifs to the traditional liturgy. Melodies will be introduced for the most common piyyutim (religious poetry), basic Hebrew grammar will be reviewed, and the structure of this liturgy will be studied. The Mi Sinai melodies of the Ashkenazic tradition will be utilized for specific prayers where appropriate. Facility with reading Hebrew is required. Cantorial students may audit only; will not count for graduate credit for masters students in the Cantorial Program.

Basic Cantillation
Syllabus 

CG CANTR 519

Treitman

F, 9-11:15 am

3

This class is an introduction to the basic concepts of Torah cantillation. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring the skills needed to chant Torah on weekdays, Sabbaths and Festivals using a common Ashkenazi trope. Topics will also include the rituals surrounding the Torah service, the history of cantillation/trope, correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew, and the underlying syntactic structure of the system of cantillation. While this course is primarily for rabbinical students, others are welcome (depending on size of the class), provided they have adequate sense of musical pitch and the ability to read and translate biblical Hebrew. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or permission of the instructor. Does not count for graduate credit for students in the Cantorial Ordination programs. Does not count for graduate credit for students in CEP. Prerequisite: Cantillation I

Cantillation III
Syllabus 

CG CANTR 531

Jacobson

Tu, 9-11 am

3

A continuation of Cantillation 1, in this course, students are taught a common Ashkenazi tradition for the chanting of the Festival megillot (Ruth, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs) and the High Holiday Torah reading. Students prepare significant portions of text to be chanted and critiqued by the instructor and their fellow students. Emphasis is on the three functions of the Masoretic cantillation signs: syllabic stress, syntactic structure and melodic organization. Prerequisite: Cantillation I

Shabbat Nusach

CG CANTR 551

Mayer

M&W, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

4

In the first part of the term students learn musical modes for Ashkenazi prayer chant and analyze their structural elements. Students then learn the specific motivic content for leading Sabbath services within the Ashkenazi tradition. In practicum sessions, emphasis is on modal and motivic improvisation within the established framework of Nusach Ashkenaz. Students also learn appropriate congregational melodies for the Sabbath services. Prerequisite: Fundementals of Ashkenazi Nusach (fomerly Daily Nusach)

Cantorial Coaching

CG CANTR 579

Staff

TBA

1

This course provides coaching by a practicing cantor who will guide the student according to his or her individual needs. Goals of coaching are to increase facility with prayer leading and to improve vocal and musical interpretations of selected repertoire as pertains to the Jewish Life Cycle. The student will be evaluated on the benchmark requirements by the third year of residency to ascertain proficiency. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned
into one of the SJM programs or by permission of the SJM. May be repeated
for credit.

Cantorial Internship II

CG CANTR 922

Staff

TBA

1

Students spend a semester on location in a synagogue, working with a practicing cantor, with opportunities for leading services and or various teaching situations. The on-site cantor meets with and coaches the student in the practical application of skills learned in the classroom. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the SJM programs. Prerequisite: Cantorial Internship I

Preparation for Comprehensive Exams

CE CANTR 997 TBA - 1

This course is open to cantorial students only in their final semester before ordination and is intended for review and completion of all comprehensive exams required in either Nusach or Cantillation. Enrollment is with permission of the Dean of the School of Jewish MusicOpen only to Cantorial Students in their final semester.

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EDUCATION
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Teaching in and Across Religious Traditions
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 680

Shire

Jan 13-15: 9 am-4 pm;Jan 16: 6-8 pm; Jan 17: 9 am-1 pm

Meets at Andover-Newton Theological Seminary

3

The course seeks to explore and practice the art and craft of teaching in the Jewish & Christian traditions. The course will focus on common issues shared by the two traditions but approached in particularistic ways: the teaching of Bible and the Prophets, teaching social responsibility and tzedaka, and cultivating ritual practices and observance of a religious tradition. It also inductively explores what is being learned from interfaith encounters and ministries regarding religious identity and openness to one's neighbors as a religious educator. Limited enrollment.

Seminar in Educational Leadership and Supervision
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 710

Regosin

Online

3

Course explores the process of educational supervision, instructional leadership and organizational leadership in Jewish education. Students will consider and practice varied models of supervision and staff development and examine issues of change in Jewish education. In addition, students will practice Jewish educational leadership skills, including public speaking, homiletics and educational planning and problem solving. For advanced students and supervisors.

Theory and Practice of 21st Century Jewish Education 
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 834

Price

Online

3

Course explores the theories of 21st century Jewish education and ways that these theories inform practice. We will examine different tools for learning and teaching across educational venues. The course will explore how different applications support current theories in Jewish education and will also identify the pedagogic implications for integration of technology and ideas of 21st century education into learning experiences for Jewish education.

The Jewish Calendar: A Tapestry of Holidays and Celebrations
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 545

Rodenstein

Online

3

This course will explore the Jewish Holidays, across time and space. Participants will study Biblical, Rabbinic and contemporary sources to uncover the central themes and values, symbols, rituals and practices associated with each holiday. After reaching a deeper knowledge of their origins and central messages, we will develop a repertoire of resources and strategies appropriate to our individual educational settings and target audiences. Particular attention will be paid to the cycles of nature and the agricultural seasons, the historical milestones of the evolving Jewish People, and the ways in which our celebrations of the holidays enhance our relationships with the Divine. 

Pedagogy of B'nei Mitzvah 
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 595

Treitman

Th, 9-11 am

2

This course is designed to enable educators working with pre-bar- and bat-mitzvah-age students to develop a curriculum to prepare them for this important lifecycle event and to develop a ceremony that reflects the individual child. Topics will include lesson planning, dealing with different learning styles, group teaching, homiletics and problem solving. The course will examine the process of this lifecycle event from a variety of viewpoints, including religious, psychological, social and historical. Participants in the course will be expected to develop a portfolio that includes lesson plans and strategies for their students. Students who are currently tutoring are encouraged to develop materials for their pupils. Prerequisites: Cantillation I or basic understanding of cantillation

Impact of Disabilities on Behavior 
Syllabus

CG EDUC 571 

Gold

Online: March 24-May 9, 2014

1

In today's formal and informal Jewish educational programs, children's behavior is an important component of their social and academic experience. This course will explore the interaction between learning issues, behaviors and performance. Just as students' behavior impacts their learning, so too do their special learning needs impact their behaviors.  We will examine functional behavior analysis, collaborative problem solving, and "social autopsies" as strategies to help understand student behaviors and to improve their social skills.  

High Incidence Special Needs in Jewish Settings
Syllabus

CG EDUC 565

Balsam

Online: Feb. 3-March 14

1

This module will provide participants with an overview of the most commonly seen disabilities (intellectual and social/emotional challenges, learning disabilities, non-verbal learning disabilities, AD/HD, and giftedness) and their impact on learning.  Participants will examine noteworthy educational practices in Jewish formal and informal educational settings.

Supervised Field Experience I

CG EDUC 915 

Schultz

This is a two semester course

1

Course covers two semesters of supervised experience in a Jewish setting, i.e., school, agency or synagogue. A minimum of six to 10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education

Supervised Field Experience II

CG EDUC 916

Schultz

This is a two semester course

1

Course covers two semesters supervised experience in a Jewish setting, i.e., school, agency or synagogue, that is different from the one experienced in EDUC 915. A minimum of six to 10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be designed to meet the professional needs of students at a more advanced level. Focus on application and integration of expanded knowledge. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. All experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Supervised Field Experience I

Research Studies in Jewish Education for Jewish Educational Leaders

ED JLS 6240 Shire Online 3

This course will explore the trends in educational research that impact Jewish education. There have been qualitative and quantitative studies of aspects of Jewish Education over the past 25 years as well as foundational research in secular and religious education that provides implications for the field of Jewish Education. We will explore the purposes and implications of policy research and review how research studies are a means by which educational leaders can understand and explain their own and other’s work as well as make more informed decision choices. This course is designed to guide in reading educational research with a critical lens noting that conceptual design and methodology of research studies needs to be understood in its context and operational definitions. Offered to students in the JELT program only. 

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HEBREW (ON CAMPUS)
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary. 

COURSE TITLE

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Hebrew VI

CG HEBRW 206 

Davis

M, Tu, Th; 2:30-4 pm

3

Course will focus on developing student's ability to handle Hebrew texts from the biblical and rabbinic corpora, while advancing knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary. Texts prepared in advance by the students will be reviewed and discussed in class; in the first part of the course, these will consist of various genres of biblical texts, and in the second, tannaitic and medieval texts. The language of instruction is both English and Hebrew. Level: Mekorot

Hebrew VIII

CG HEBRW 208 

Bock

Th; 2:30-4 pm

3

With a primary goal of building their skills in accurately reading and analyzing unvocalized Hebrew texts, students will read short stories of S.Y. Agnon with a close focus on their language. A portion of classroom discussion will be conducted in Hebrew, and students will have the opportunity to write short essays in Hebrew. Level: Year 1

Aramaic

RB HEBRW 211

Bock

Th, 2:30-4 pm

3

Students will learn the basic features of Aramaic grammar, focusing on the dialect of Aramaic used in the Babylonian Talmud. A solid knowledge of Hebrew grammar will be expected, so that students can take advantage of systematic correspondences between Hebrew and Aramaic grammar. Some experience reading Talmudic texts will also be presumed. The texts that are read consist primarily of aggadic materials from the Babylonian Talmud. At the end of the course, other texts with liturgical and halakhic significance will be read as well. 

Sources: Reading in Hebrew II

MG HEBRW 521 Davis M, 6:30-9:15 pm 3

A continuation of Sources: Readings in Hebrew 1, this course will offer a unique experience of learning Hebrew throughout its history, via diverse genres of literature. It will draw on a variety of Hebrew texts from a selection of sources including the Bible, mishnah, midrash, medieval texts, Hassidic tales, haskala-era Hebrew literature and modern Hebrew short stories. The anthology of readings will be drawn from the book of Exodus, Ethics of our Fathers, as well as works of Maimonides, Ramban, Yehuda HaLevi, Martin Buber, Shai Agnon, Hayim Nachman Bialik, Meir Shalev, Amos Oz, and Etgar Keret. Grammatical concepts will be fully integrated into this literature-oriented course. Prerequisite: Sources: Readings in Hebrew I

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HEBREW (ONLINE)
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language 

CU HEBRW 010

Levy

Online

0

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students progress at their own pace, submit oral and written homework, and take online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew From Scratch), the textbook used by Hebrew College's campus-based and online Hebrew Language programs. Textbook: Mekhina, Introductory units of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Hebrew I 

CU HEBRW 110

Levy

Online

4 UG

This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Textbook: Hebrew I, Lessons 1–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew IA

 CU HEBRW 111A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
 

Hebrew IB 

 CU HEBRW 111B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew II 

 CU HEBRW 210

Levy

Online

4 UG

A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Textbook: Hebrew II, Lessons 15–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIA 

 CU HEBRW 211A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIB 

 CU HEBRW 211B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

Hebrew III 

 CU HEBRW 310

Levy

Online

4 UG

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Textbook: Hebrew III, Lessons 1-8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIA 

 CU HEBRW 311A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIB 

 CU HEBRW 311B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

Hebrew IV 

 CU HEBRW 410

Levy

Online

4 UG

This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Textbook: Hebrew III, Lessons 9-16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

 CU HEBRW 411A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

 CU HEBRW 411B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

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ULPAN
 

The Ulpan spring semester will run from Feb. 2 to May 16. Click here for list of Ulpan courses

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HISTORY
         

COURSE TITLE

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

History and Memory: Medieval and Modern Periods 
Syllabus 

CG HIST 534

Fuchs

Online

3

Working within a chronological framework, this course will trace the creative transformation of Judaism in the medieval period and the profound challenges posed by modernity. Students will have the opportunity to critically engage with primary sources. Major events and personalities of these two historical periods will be considered.

Second Temple and Early Rabbinic Judaism
Syllabus 

CG HIST 151 Klawans M, 2:30-4 pm 3
This course is a survey of the diversity and development of Judaism in the ancient world, covering some of the events and phenomena that shaped ancient Judaism: the impact of Hellenism, the Maccabean revolt and the Roman conquest. Some course time is devoted to the first century of the Common Era--the important period that saw both the birth of Christianity and the destruction of the ancient Jewish state, which in turn gave way to the beginnings of rabbinic civilization.
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INTERDISCIPLINARY
         

COURSE TITLE

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Graduate Research Seminar

CG INTD 601 

Mesch

W, 2:30-4:30 pm

2

Students will complete work on their master's papers and discuss research methods and approaches to the field. At the end of the course, students will present the results of their research to the Hebrew College community in a public forum. Required of all MAJS and MJLS students, this course is normally taken during the Spring Semester prior to graduation.

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JEWISH THOUGHT
         

COURSE TITLE

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Maimonides, Spinoza and Mendelssohn
Syllabus 

CG JTHT 525

Breuer

Online

3

The greatest Jewish thinkers, like the great thinkers of other religious traditions, distinguished themselves by their ability to reexamine and reinterpret received ideas and texts in profound and far-reaching ways. For medieval and modern Jews, this feature of religious life was a means of rendering ancient traditions meaningful to societies and cultural contexts far removed from their biblical and rabbinic origins. All three of these philosophers were deeply influenced by the intellectual traditions prevailing in their own countries as they developed approaches to Judaism and Jewish life consistent with these contexts. Through careful reading of selections from Maimonides' "Guide of the Perplexed," Spinoza's "Theologico-Political Treatise," and Mendelssohn's "Jerusalem," this course will examine the ways in which these outstanding Jews read and interpreted classical Jewish texts.

Problem of Evil in Jewish Thought
 

CG JTHT 560 

Mesch

Online

4

Throughout the history of western religious thought, perhaps the most enduring issue has been "the problem of evil." What kind of relationship can God, the creator of the universe, have with the evil that exists in the world? Where does it come from and who bears responsibility for it? The course will provide an opportunity to examine the responses of the Jewish tradition to these and other related issues.

Jewish Life and Practice II

Syllabus



Syllabus

 RB INTD 016

Lehmann

F, 11:30 am-1 pm 

3

Students will be introduced to the patterns and essential terminology of the cycle of Jewish religious life and other basic Jewish practices.

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LITURGY
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Liturgy of the High Holidays 
Syllabus 

CG LITGY 593 

Blank T, 11:15 am-1:15 pm 3

Students will study the classic liturgy for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, including its historical evolution and theological message. Representative piyyutim (liturgical poetry) will also be analyzed. Texts will be taught in Hebrew. Open to both rabbinical students and those in the Cantor-Educator program. Prerequisite: Hebrew V

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MUSIC
         

COURSE NAME

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Voice Lessons 

CG MUSIC 200

Staff Private lessons 1
For credit only 

Private lessons in singing with emphasis is on understanding the working of the vocal mechanism, maximizing the potential of the individual singer, learning to be an effective vocal teacher, and preparing the student to be an inspiring performer. Students will be taught how to use correct technique while singing a variety of different styles of music. Students will be required to participate in a studio recital once each semester and to memorize the music that is being performed. To adjudicate progress, students will also be required to sing in Vocal Boards, performing a liturgical selection either from memory or from the Hebrew text, and a secular piece from memory from repertoire to be approved in advance. Students in the music programs will be required repeat this course for credit each semester.

Vocal Performance

CG MUSIC 201 

Torgove W, 9-11 am

The vocal performance class concentrates on building basic vocal skills–breath, resonance, posture and technique–and integrates those skills into students’ repertoires. Students will bring their own selections, including davenning, leyning, solo song, song leading, spoken presentations, from their individual practices and cantorial/rabbinical class work; these will provide the vehicle for their vocal work and coaching with the instructor in a supportive classroom environment. Students in the music programs must take for credit and maybe required to repeat this course for credit each semester.

Kol Arev Workshop

CG MUSIC 305 Lieberman M, 4:30-6:35 pm 1

This course is for students who have successfully auditioned for and who will serve as members of Kol Arev, the Hebrew College Choir, during the academic year. Students in the music programs may repeat this course for credit each semester.

Topics in Jewish Music Education

CG MUSIC 502

Klepper

Th, 11:15 am-1:15 pm

2

This course offers a hands-on approach to the teaching of Jewish music in educational settings. Three specific areas will be covered: 1) tapping music's power to create community and reinforce Jewish identity, 2) teaching liturgical melodies and leading services and 3) using music within the school curriculum to teach Jewish knowledge and values. A basic repertoire of songs in these areas (from pre-school through high-school) will be shared, and students will practice song teaching and leading skills at each class session. Students should be able to read and understand basic Hebrew prayers, to sing comfortably and on-pitch. The ability to read music and a facility on either guitar or keyboard is highly recommended.

Choir

CG MUSIC 546

Lieberman

N/A

1

Students sing or serve as conducting interns in a choir specializing in Jewish repertoire. Participation must be approved in advance with the choir coordinator. Students in the music programs may repeat this course for credit each semester.

Senior Recital

CG MUSIC 905

Staff

Private lessons

1

Private lessons in singing with emphasis on preparing the student for the senior recital, this course will be taken instead of voice lessons during final two semesters before graduation. Students in the music programs may repeat this course for credit each semester of their final year.

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PARDES
         

The following courses are offered to students enrolled in the Pardes Educators Program only.

COURSE NAME

 COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Behavior Management in the Inclusive Classroom

CG EDUC 555 

TBA

N/A

3

Students will learn to carry out a variety of behavior-change strategies within educational settings. Emphasis will be placed on the development of supportive classroom structures that lead to positive interactions among students with and without special needs, and between students and teachers. Students will also consider the Jewish dimension of behavioral management, specifically how values such as "derech eretz" can be reflected in general learning experiences.

Seminar in Jewish Day School Education

CG EDUC 826

Lehmann

N/A

3

Students will study the unique learning contexts of Jewish day schools and the particular challenges and opportunities they present to teachers. Students will consider selected problems in teaching a curriculum that includes Jewish and general studies; integration of multiple disciplines; and intentions to foster Judaic, Hebraic and English literacy at high levels of understanding. This course is for student teachers in Jewish day schools as well as classroom teachers who are at the early stages of their careers in Jewish day-school training. 

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RABBINICS
         

COURSE NAME

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Introduction to Talmud
Syllabus

CG RAB 520

Rhodes

Tu, Th; 11:30 am-1 pm

3

Students in this course will learn the skills of analyzing a variety of Talmudic texts, aggadic and halakhic. How are Talmudic sugyot (thematic units of a Talmudic tractate) constructed? What are the recurring technical terms of a Talmudic "discussion?" What are the conceptual assumptions of Talmudic discourse? What are the social and cultural contexts of the sugyot? Students will learn basic Talmudic terminology, including a glossary of Hebrew and Aramaic terms and concepts, and how to use dictionaries, concordances and other reference tools to decipher and understand a Talmudic sugya. This course also includes selections from the commentaries of Rashi and the Tosaphot with an examination of their interpretive concerns and methods. Students will be required to record selections from the Talmudic texts in order to improve skills in reading Rabbinic Hebrew. Some previous exposure to rabbinic literature is desirable.

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