Spring 2014 Online Courses

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CantorialEducationHebrew HistoryJewish Thought

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CANTORIAL
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

How to Lead High Holy Day Services
Syllabus

CG CANTR 514

Schwartz

Online

3

This course provides students with the skills necessary to lead the traditional prayers of services of the high holidays. Students will explore the musical modes of Nusach HaTefillah that are chanted throughout these holidays, and apply those musical motifs to the traditional liturgy. Melodies will be introduced for the most common piyyutim (religious poetry), basic Hebrew grammar will be reviewed, and the structure of this liturgy will be studied. The Mi Sinai melodies of the Ashkenazic tradition will be utilized for specific prayers where appropriate. Facility with reading Hebrew is required. Cantorial students may audit only; will not count for graduate credit for masters students in the Cantorial Program.

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EDUCATION
         

COURSE TITLE

COURSE NO.

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Seminar in Educational Leadership and Supervision
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 710

Regosin

Online

3

Course explores the process of educational supervision, instructional leadership and organizational leadership in Jewish education. Students will consider and practice varied models of supervision and staff development and examine issues of change in Jewish education. In addition, students will practice Jewish educational leadership skills, including public speaking, homiletics and educational planning and problem solving. For advanced students and supervisors.

Theory and Practice of 21st Century Jewish Education
Syllabus

CG EDUC 834

Price

Online

3

Course explores the theories of 21st century Jewish education and ways that these theories inform practice. We will examine different tools for learning and teaching across educational venues. The course will explore how different applications support current theories in Jewish education and will also identify the pedagogic implications for integration of technology and ideas of 21st century education into learning experiences for Jewish education.

The Jewish Calendar: A Tapestry of Holidays and Celebrations
Syllabus 

CG EDUC 545

Rodenstein

Online

3

This course will explore the Jewish Holidays, across time and space. Participants will study Biblical, Rabbinic and contemporary sources to uncover the central themes and values, symbols, rituals and practices associated with each holiday. After reaching a deeper knowledge of their origins and central messages, we will develop a repertoire of resources and strategies appropriate to our individual educational settings and target audiences. Particular attention will be paid to the cycles of nature and the agricultural seasons, the historical milestones of the evolving Jewish People, and the ways in which our celebrations of the holidays enhance our relationships with the Divine. 

Impact of Disabilities on Behavior
Syllabus

CG EDUC 571 

Gold

Online: March 24-May 9, 2014

1

In today's formal and informal Jewish educational programs, children's behavior is an important component of their social and academic experience. This course will explore the interaction between learning issues, behaviors and performance. Just as students' behavior impacts their learning, so too do their special learning needs impact their behaviors.  We will examine functional behavior analysis, collaborative problem solving, and "social autopsies" as strategies to help understand student behaviors and to improve their social skills.  

High Incidence Special Needs in Jewish Settings
Syllabus

 CG EDUC 565

Balsam

Online: Feb. 3-March 14

1

This module will provide participants with an overview of the most commonly seen disabilities (intellectual and social/emotional challenges, learning disabilities, non-verbal learning disabilities, AD/HD, and giftedness) and their impact on learning.  Participants will examine noteworthy educational practices in Jewish formal and informal educational settings.

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HEBREW
         

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.

COURSE TITLE

 

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language 

 CU HEBRW 010

Levy

Online

Non-credit only

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students progress at their own pace, submit oral and written homework, and take online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew From Scratch), the textbook used by Hebrew College's campus-based and online Hebrew Language programs. Textbook: Mekhina, Introductory units of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Hebrew I 

 CU HEBRW 110

Levy

Online

4 UG

This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Textbook: Hebrew I, Lessons 1–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew IA

 CU HEBRW 111A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
 

Hebrew IB 

 CU HEBRW 111B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew II 

 CU HEBRW 210

Levy

Online

4 UG

A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Textbook: Hebrew II, Lessons 15–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIA 

 CU HEBRW 211A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

Hebrew IIB 

 CU HEBRW 211B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

Hebrew III 

 CU HEBRW 310

Levy

Online

4 UG

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Textbook: Hebrew III, Lessons 1-8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIA 

 CU HEBRW 311A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Hebrew IIIB 

 CU HEBRW 311B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

Hebrew IV 

 CU HEBRW 410

Levy

Online

4 UG

This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Textbook: Hebrew III, Lessons 9-16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

 CU HEBRW 411A

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew IVA 

 CU HEBRW 411B

Levy

Online

2 UG

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

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HISTORY
         

COURSE TITLE

 

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

History and Memory: Medieval and Modern Periods 
Syllabus 

 CG HIST 534

Fuchs

Online

3

Working within a chronological framework, this course will trace the creative transformation of Judaism in the medieval period and the profound challenges posed by modernity. Students will have the opportunity to critically engage with primary sources. Major events and personalities of these two historical periods will be considered.

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JEWISH THOUGHT
         

COURSE TITLE

 

INSTRUCTOR

TIME

CREDITS

Maimonides, Spinoza and Mendelssohn
Syllabus

 CG JTHT 525

Breuer

Online

3

The greatest Jewish thinkers, like the great thinkers of other religious traditions, distinguished themselves by their ability to reexamine and reinterpret received ideas and texts in profound and far-reaching ways. For medieval and modern Jews, this feature of religious life was a means of rendering ancient traditions meaningful to societies and cultural contexts far removed from their biblical and rabbinic origins. All three of these philosophers were deeply influenced by the intellectual traditions prevailing in their own countries as they developed approaches to Judaism and Jewish life consistent with these contexts. Through careful reading of selections from Maimonides' "Guide of the Perplexed," Spinoza's "Theologico-Political Treatise," and Mendelssohn's "Jerusalem," this course will examine the ways in which these outstanding Jews read and interpreted classical Jewish texts.

Problem of Evil in Jewish Thought CG JTHT 560 

Mesch

Online

4

Throughout the history of western religious thought, perhaps the most enduring issue has been "the problem of evil." What kind of relationship can God, the creator of the universe, have with the evil that exists in the world? Where does it come from and who bears responsibility for it? The course will provide an opportunity to examine the responses of the Jewish tradition to these and other related issues. This course will also have a one hour chevruta session each week where students will be paired off for real-time study of texts related to the course. The instructor will be available during parts of these sessions for guidance and instruction.

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