Spring 2015 Courses

View courses by discipline:
  BIBLE   CANTORIAL    EDUCATION HEBREW (ON CAMPUS) HEBREW (ONLINE)    HEBREW (ULPAN)
 
 HISTORY INTERDISCIPLINARY  LITERATURE  LITURGY MUSIC RABBINICS

 

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BIBLE
Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature II CG-BIBLE 502B
T, 11 am-1pm | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Adelman

The second part of a two-semester sequence, this course entails an introduction to the full complement of Biblical poetry, in its literary and historical context, and to modes of poetic interpretation and analysis. The course will cover selections from the Torah, Psalms, Proverbs, and the Book of Job, as well as selections from the Prophets such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah. We will discuss poetry imbedded within narrative, genres of Prophetic writings, apocalyptic revelations, and wisdom literature. Prerequisite: Hebrew V

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CANTORIAL
How to Lead Shabbat Services CG CANTR 514 
Online | 3 graduate credits  Schwartz

This course provides students with both theoretical background and basic skills necessary to lead Sabbath services. Students will analyze the musical modes of “nusah haTefillah,” master the significant musical motifs needed for leading traditional services in the Ashkenazic tradition and learn principles for choosing appropriate congregational melodies to be used during Shabbat services, based on the analysis of the musical modes assigned to the various liturgical units. Students in the Cantorial Ordination programs cannot take this course for credit. 

Basic Nusach CG CANTR 517
F, 9-11:15 am | 3 graduate credits SyllabusTorgove

This class is an introduction to the modes and motifs for synagogue prayer during weekday and Sabbath worship. Emphasis will be on basic proficiency in traditional prayer leading, rudimentary musical skills and an introduction to the liturgical structure of weekday and Shabbat services. Students in the Cantorial Ordination programs cannot take this course for credit.

Accompanied Repertoire for Shabbat  CG CANTR 595
W, 9-11 am3 graduate credits  Syllabus | Treitman

Students learn cantorial and congregational repertoire for Sabbath services that involves instrumental accompaniment. Repertoire includes nineteenth-century European classics and twentieth-century American composers and songwriters. Students also investigate contemporary services, such as “Friday Night Live,” “B’nai Jeshurum,” “Carlebach,” and “Eylat Chayim.” Prerequisites: Musicianship Skills II, Liturgy of the Synagogue

Festival Nusach CG CANTR 552
M, 9-11 am; W, 11:15 am-1:15 pm | 4 graduate credits Mayer

In the first part of the term students learn musical modes for Ashkenazic prayer chant and analyze their structural elements. Students then learn the specific motivic content for leading Festival services within the Ashkenazic tradition. In practicum sessions, emphasis is on modal and motivic improvisation within the established framework of Nusach Ashkenaz. Students also learn appropriate congregational melodies for the Festival services. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Ashkenazi Nusach 

Cantorial Coaching CG CANTR 579
TBA | 1 graduate credit Staff

This course provides coaching by a practicing cantor who will guide the student according to his or her individual needs. Goals of coaching are to increase facility with prayer leading and to improve vocal and musical interpretations of selected repertoire as pertains to the Jewish Life Cycle. The student will be evaluated on the benchmark requirements by the third year of residency to ascertain proficiency. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the SJM program or by permission of the SJM. SJM students may repeat course multiple times for credit.

Cantorial Internship 2 CE CANTR 922
TBA | 1 graduate credit Treitman

Students spend a semester on location in a synagogue, working with a practicing cantor, with opportunities for leading services and or various teaching situations. The on-site cantor meets with and coaches the student in the practical application of skills learned in the classroom. Prerequisite: Cantorial Internship1

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EDUCATION
Teaching and Facilitating Tefillah CG EDUC 711 CE 
M, 11:15 am-1:15 pm; March 16- May 18 | 2 graduate credits Richmond

This course is designed to connect the literature of effective teaching with the study of Jewish prayer. Critical thinking activities will be emphasized as students create an active learner-centered classroom around the subject of prayer. Our topics will include effective teaching behaviors, cooperative learning with multiple intelligences, learner-centered assignments, technology, motivation and reflective teaching. Students will explore their own relationship with tefillah and have chances to model teaching tefillah to the class.  

Seminar in Educational Leadership  CG EDUC 710
Online3 graduate credits Syllabus | Regosin

This course explores the process of educational supervision, instructional leadership and organizational leadership in Jewish education. Students will consider and practice varied models of supervision and staff development and examine issues of change in Jewish education. In addition, students will practice Jewish educational leadership skills, including public speaking, homiletics and educational planning and problem solving. For advanced students and supervisors.  

Theory and Practice of 21st Century Jewish Education CG EDUC 834
Online | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Price

This course explores the theories of 21st century Jewish education and ways that these theories inform practice. We will examine different tools for learning and teaching across educational venues. The course will explore how different applications support current theories in Jewish education and will also identify the pedagogic implications for integration of technology and ideas of 21st century education into learning experiences for Jewish education. 

Creating Inclusive School Environments CG EDUC 546
Online | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Gold

The purpose of this course is to identify the social/emotional and academic needs of students with special needs in inclusive Jewish settings. The first part of the course will focus on identification of children with special needs and the assessment process. Different trends and issues in education surrounding service delivery models will then be explored. The final portion of the course will focus on what schools and teachers can do to create inclusive, tolerant environments for all children.

Creating a School-wide Inclusive Environment CG EDUC 546A
Online; April 20-May 22 | 1 graduate credit Syllabus | Gold

The purpose of this course is to focus on what Jewish schools and teachers can do to create inclusive, tolerant environments for all children. Topics that will be explored include character education, PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports) and an examination of existing programs that promote school- wide social emotional learning. Students will demonstrate an understanding of strategies for increasing positive behaviors and promoting social integration of children with special needs in general education settings. This course partially fulfills the special education requirement.

Creating a Developmentally Appropriate Early Childhood Curriculum CG EDUC 502
Online | 3 graduate credits Brody

This course focuses on the skills necessary for planning and implementing curricula for early childhood classrooms. The holiday cycle will be studied as a basis for integrating art, music, science, mathematics and language arts as well as Jewish values, customs and symbols into classroom practice. This course fulfills a pedagogic application course requirement.

Teaching Rabbinic Literature CG EDUC 592
Online | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Janes

This course in textual teaching explores the relationship between knowledge of rabbinic literature and teaching the texts of our tradition. We will explore a number of domains of teaching rabbinic literature and by doing so offer a variety of pedagogies of text teaching. The teaching of rabbinic literature is a spiritual practice that combines deep insight into the human mind and social condition with a thrilling journey into the historical development of Jewish thought. This course fulfills a pedagogic application course requirement.  

Spiritual Development for Jewish Education  CG EDUC 626 W1
Online | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Shire

Too often Jewish education has been primarily concerned with transmission of knowledge, acquisition of skills, and developing Jewish identity in young people. Nurturing the spiritual growth of the child is often missing from Jewish educational practice. This course seeks to explore the spiritual life of the child, and will draw upon the latest research and our own experience, offering a Jewish lens with which to view this spirituality from our traditional sources. We will seek to develop new practices for Jewish education in classrooms, camps, synagogues, community centers that nurture the Jewish spiritual life of our children. The course will offer an educational focus for spiritual development, including the spirit of the child, sacred teaching, spiritual learning and transforming Jewish education. This course fulfills a pedagogic application course requirement.  

Spiritual Development for Jewish Education
CG EDUC 626 C1
W, 3:30-5 pm | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Shire

Too often Jewish education has been primarily concerned with transmission of knowledge, acquisition of skills, and developing Jewish identity in young people. Nurturing the spiritual growth of the child is often missing from Jewish educational practice. This course seeks to explore the spiritual life of the child, and will draw upon the latest research and our own experience, offering a Jewish lens with which to view this spirituality from our traditional sources. We will seek to develop new practices for Jewish education in classrooms, camps, synagogues, community centers that nurture the Jewish spiritual life of our children. The course will offer an educational focus for spiritual development, including the spirit of the child, sacred teaching, spiritual learning and transforming Jewish education. This course fulfills a pedagogic application course requirement.

Supervised Field Experience I CG EDUC 915 
TBA | 1 graduate credit (this is a yearlong course) Schultz 

Course consists of supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All experiences must be approved by the Director of Field Experiences. 

Supervised Field Experience II CG EDUC 916
TBA | 1 graduate credit (this is a yearlong course) Schultz

Course consists of supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All experiences must be approved by the Director of Field Experiences. Prerequisite: Supervised Field Experience I

Supervised Field Experience in Special Education CG EDUC 924
TBA | 1 graduate credit (this is a yearlong course) Schultz

This course is a full academic year- long supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, camp, etc.) serving students with a variety of special needs. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student.  If appropriate, a current paid position could be the basis for the experience with a focus on expanding the role to include a wide range of skills. All experiences must be approved by the Director of Field Experiences.

Supervised Field Experience in Special Education I CG EDUC 926
TBA | 1 graduate redit (this is a yearlong course) Schultz

Full academic year- long experience may include a mentoring relationship and/or arranged group visits to a variety of early childhood settings. Students will keep a journal to focus on observation, reflection and application. All experiences will be coordinated by the Director of Field Experiences. Prerequisite: Certificate in Early Childhood Jewish Education 

Supervised Field Experience in Special Education II CG EDUC 927
TBA | 1 graduate credit (this is a yearlong course) Schultz

Full academic year supervised field experience in an early childhood Jewish setting. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required. Experiences will be designed to meet the professional needs of students.  Focus on application and integration of expanded knowledge.  If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. All experiences must be approved by the Director of Field Experiences. Prerequisite: Supervised Field Experience in Early Childhood I

Case Studies in Jewish Education Leadership CG JLS 903
Online; March 2- April 24 | 3 graduate credits Elkin

 This course will explore leadership challenges in a variety of Jewish educational settings, including day schools, supplemental schools, summer teen programs/camps, and Hillels. We will use the case study method in order to uncover and delve into the nuances and challenges facing Jewish educational leaders. The online learning modules will feature a range of teaching strategies—group work, on-line discussion, presentations, and simulations. Background material on leadership will be drawn from current leadership experts within the fields of business, government, non-profit organizations, and Jewish educational institutions. Credit Students: Open to MJE students with permission of their advisor only. Non-credit Students: Must have permission of the Dean of the Shoolman School of Jewish Education.

Case Studies in Jewish Education Leadership ED JLS 903
Online; March 2- April 24 | 3 graduate credits Elkin

Open to JLDS students only.

This course will explore leadership challenges in a variety of Jewish educational settings, including day schools, supplemental schools, summer teen programs/camps, and Hillels. We will use the case study method in order to uncover and delve into the nuances and challenges facing Jewish educational leaders. The online learning modules will feature a range of teaching strategies—group work, on-line discussion, presentations, and simulations. Background material on leadership will be drawn from current leadership experts within the fields of business, government, non-profit organizations, and Jewish educational institutions. 

Connected Learning CG EDUC 691 P1
Online; Jan.18- May 29 | 3 graduate credits Syllabus | Levine

Open to Pardes Educators only.

What does it mean to be educators and learners in an increasingly connected world? How does technology, including the Internet and social media, impact how we learn and teach? What are implications for how we see ourselves as educators and learners? This course will examine what it means to be an educator and learner in the 21st/58th century. We will explore—and experiment with—educational theory and practice and develop new literacies and skill sets for robust learning and teaching in Jewish day schools and professional growth.  

Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish Education: Final Project CG EDUC 707 P1
Online; Jan. 18 - May 29 | 1 graduate credit  Syllabus | Gribetz

Open to Pardes Educators only.

This course will explore leadership challenges in a variety of Jewish educational settings, including day schools, supplemental schools, summer teen programs/camps, and Hillels. We will use the case study method in order to uncover and delve into the nuances and challenges facing Jewish educational leaders. The online learning modules will feature a range of teaching strategies—group work, on-line discussion, presentations, and simulations. Background material on leadership will be drawn from current leadership experts within the fields of business, government, non-profit organizations, and Jewish educational institutions.

The research seminar is, in many ways, the culmination of a student’s years of study at Hebrew College and Pardes and provides students with the opportunity to integrate their learning of Judaic texts with educational theories and practice. The final project allows students to further investigate a topic that intrigues them and relates to their work. The project is submitted as a bound written paper and presented orally at an end-of-year day of celebration. 

Behavior Management in the Inclusive Classroom CG EDUC 555 P1
Online; Jan. 18 - May 29 | 3 graduate credit Margolis

Open to Pardes Educators only.

 Students will learn to carry out a variety of behavior-change strategies within educational settings. Emphasis will be placed on the development of supportive classroom structures that lead to positive interactions among students with and without special needs, and between students and teachers. Students will also consider the Jewish dimension of behavioral management, specifically how values such as “derech eretz” can be reflected in general learning experiences.

Seminar in Jewish Day School Education CG EDUC 826 P1
Online; Jan. 18 - May 29 | 3 graduate credit  SyllabusD. Lehmann

Open to Pardes Educators only.

 Students will study the unique learning contexts of Jewish day schools and the particular challenges and opportunities they present to teachers. Students will consider selected problems in teaching a curriculum that includes Jewish and general studies; integration of multiple disciplines; and intentions to foster Judaic, Hebraic and English literacy at high levels of understanding. This course is for student teachers in Jewish day schools as well as classroom teachers who are at the early stages of their careers in Jewish day-school training.

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HEBREW (ON CAMPUS)
All classes require the purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.
Hebrew VI CG HEBRW 206
M, Tu, Th; 2:30-4 pm | 4 graduate credits  Roth

Building on Hebrew III and IV, the two-semester sequence of Hebrew V and VI focuses on more advanced Modern Hebrew language structures and prose writings. Students will deepen their understanding of the Hebrew language, with emphasis on skill acquisition and development through the extensive use of classical and modern texts. This course gives a systematic presentation of grammatical and syntactic principles of biblical and rabbinic Hebrew (including vocabulary). Texts of different styles, such as narrative, poetry, prophecy and wisdom literature, are examined with an emphasis on literary analysis.

Hebrew VIII CG HEBRW 208
Th, 2:30-4 pm | 2 graduate credits  Syllabus | Bock

For students who want to work with classical Jewish texts in depth, including students in the rabbinic and cantorial programs, this course will focus on the phonology, morphology and syntax of Biblical Hebrew. Solid prior knowledge of Hebrew, including mastery of the Hebrew verb system, is a prerequisite, as this course will assume such knowledge as it addresses aspects of Hebrew grammar that are distinctive of Biblical Hebrew, including the Tiberian vocalization (nikud) and accentuation system, Biblical Hebrew's larger inventory of verb forms, and various syntactic features of Biblical Hebrew.

Understanding Hebrew Texts I MG HEBRW 120
W, 6:30-9:15 pm | 4 undergraduate credits
 Syllabus | Davis

Students will begin learning basic Hebrew vocabulary and grammar needed to read authentic texts. The course begins with an introduction to Hebrew Alphabet and its vowels system, basic vocabulary and grammar (phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics). There will be some in-class conversation in Hebrew, but the emphasis will be on developing reading comprehension skills. The pace of the course will be brisk, and a significant investment of study time outside the classroom will be expected.

Understanding Hebrew Texts IV MG HEBRW 420
Th, 4:30-7 pm | 4 undergraduate credits  Syllabus | Davis

This course is the fourth of the Understanding Hebrew Texts sequence. After completing volume III of the Shelabim textbook series, students will read selections from classical texts. Students will apply and extend their knowledge of Hebrew grammar to these texts and build their vocabulary, with the goal of enhancing their ability to independently read and understand Jewish texts in Hebrew. Wherever possible, connections will be made to Hebrew passages with which students are familiar from other contexts. The pace of the course will be brisk and a significant investment of time outside the classroom will be expected. Prerequisite: Hebrew III

Sources I: Standing at Sinai—Readings in Hebrew Literature MG HEBRW 520
M, 6:30-9:15 pm | 3 graduate credits Davis

This Hebrew literature course will offer a unique experience as it guides you on a journey from biblical comparative narrative to Midrash of the rabbinic era, Piyut, poetry and philosophy of the medieval and enlightenment eras, through modern Israeli literature. The anthology of readings will be drawn from the book of Exodus, Ethics of our Fathers, as well as works of Maimonides, Ramban, Yehuda HaLevi, Martin Buber, Shai Agnon, Hayim Nachman Bialik, Meir Shalev, Amos Oz, and Etgar Keret. Advanced grammatical concepts will be fully integrated into this literature-oriented course. The course will be taught in Hebrew and English. Prerequisite: Hebrew IV or above or Understanding Hebrew Texts IV

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HEBREW (ONLINE)
All classes require the purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary. All courses are offered Feb. 2- May 22, 2015
Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language  CU HEBRW 010
Online | non-credit only Levy

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students work at their own pace, submitting oral and written homework, and taking online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), the textbook used by Hebrew College’s campus-based and online Hebrew Language programs. 

Hebrew I CU HEBRW 110
Online | 4 undergraduate credits Levy

This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew IA CU HEBRW 111A
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy

This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7 of I Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.  Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

Hebrew IB CU HEBRW 111B
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy

This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Prerequisite: Hebrew IA or placement test.

Hebrew II CU HEBRW 210
Online | 4 undergraduate credits Levy

A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Prerequisite: Hebrew I or placement test.

Hebrew IIA CU HEBRW 211A
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Prerequisite: Hebrew I or placement test. 

Hebrew IIB CU HEBRW 211B
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Prerequisite: Hebrew IIA or placement test. 

Hebrew III CU HEBRW 310
Online | 4 undergradute credits Levy

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Prerequisite: Hebrew II or placement test.

Hebrew IIIA CU HEBRW 311A
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy

This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Prerequisite: Hebrew II or placement test.

Hebrew IIIB CU HEBRW 311B
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Prerequisite: Hebrew IIIA or placement test.

Hebrew IV CU HEBRW 410
Online | 4 undergraduate credits Levy

This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Prerequisite: Hebrew III or placement test.

Hebrew IVA CU HEBRW 411A
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Prerequisite: Hebrew III or placement test.

Hebrew IVB CU HEBRW 411B
Online | 2 undergraduate credits Levy

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Prerequisite: Hebrew IVA or placement test.

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HEBREW ULPAN

The Ulpan fall semester will run from Feb. 6 to May 15, 2015. Click here for spring course listings.

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HISTORY
Second Temple and Early Rabbinic Judaism   CG HIST 151
T, 2:30-4 pm | 2 graduate credits Klawans

This course is a survey of the diversity and development of Judaism in the ancient world, covering some of the events and phenomena that shaped ancient Judaism: the impact of Hellenism, the Maccabean revolt and the Roman conquest. Some course time is devoted to the first century of the Common Era-the important period that saw both the birth of Christianity and the destruction of the ancient Jewish state, which in turn gave way to the beginnings of rabbinic civilization.

History and Memory: Medieval and Modern Periods CG HIST 534
Online | 3 graduate credits Fuchs

Working within a chronological framework, this course will trace the creative transformation of Judaism in the medieval period and the profound challenges posed by modernity. Students will have the opportunity to critically engage with primary sources. Major events and personalities of these two historical periods will be considered.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY
Judaism and Religious Pluralism   CG INTD 555
Online | 3 graduate credits Rose

How does our emerging awareness of the interconnection of people across vast physical distances and religious and cultural contexts impact our identities as Jews? How do we understand the interplay of universalism and particularism in our time? What are the contours of Jewish identity in this “global village”? How might we best work across religious and cultural lines to create a more just and sustainable world? Over the last several decades, scholars and practitioners have been reflecting on these issues with greater interest and intensity from a range of perspectives. In this interdisciplinary course, participants will explore these matters by reading relevant works of philosophy, theology, history and the social sciences, and through the examination of contemporary case studies on religion and public life.

Live and Become: Israeli Society through Film CG INTD 573
Online | 4 graduate credits  
 Syllabus | Gillman

From the Zionist warrior in Hill 24 Doesn’t Answer (1955) to male soldiers in love in Yossi and Jager (2002), Israeli films depict “identities in motion” (Talmon & Peleg): national, religious, ethnic, gender and other identities in formation well into the 21st century. This course explores Israeli films that tell diverse stories about immigration; life after the Shoah; Jewish religious life; Jews and Arabs; and war. Additional readings from fiction, non-fiction, news media and film criticism provide historical context and help students develop interpretive skills. Writing assignments include film review, analytic essay, and personal reflection.

Graduate Research Seminar: Jewish Studies CG INTD 601
W, 2:30-4 pm | 2 graduate credits Mesch

Students will complete work on their master’s papers and discuss research methods and approaches to the field. At the end of the course, students will present the results of their research to the Hebrew College community in a public forum. Note: Required of all MAJS and MJLS students, this course is normally taken during the Spring Semester prior to graduation.

Topics in Jewish, Christian and Muslim Relations CG INTD 644W
Jan. 5-9, 2015; M-Th, 9 am-4 pm; F, 9 am-2 pm Rose, Pearce, Ibrahim-Lizzio
3 graduate credits Syllabus
This week-long co-taught intensive seminar is a microcosm of the approach to interreligious work at Andover Newton and Hebrew College. Given the religious diversity in our communities and sometimes even in our congregations, today’s pastors, educators, activists, and public theologians need to be knowledgeable about their neighbors from other faiths. In addition, they need the practical skills and motivation to reach across religious lines to increase understanding and cooperation. Both cognitive knowledge about various faith traditions and their diverse expressions (particularly in the Boston area) as well as skills related to relationship-building, community organizing and navigating charged or challenging conversations will be emphasized. Students will have an opportunity to meet with religious leaders, educators and activists from the Boston area who are working across religious lines on issues of common concern. Having three co-teachers (one Jewish, one Christian and one Muslim) who work together co-directing CIRCLE, the course design models a commitment to interreligious relationship-building emphasized in the course content. This course is located in the emerging field of “interreligious studies.” Prerequisite: one previous interfaith course or permission of the instructor
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LITERATURE
Introduction to Reading Biblical Literature II RB LITER 501
Th, 11:30am- 1 pm | 2 graduate credits Bock

A continuation of study begun in the fall, this course focuses on developing students’ skills in reading Hebrew texts from the Tanakh, with a primary focus on narrative material. Students will read selections in classical medieval rabbinic biblical commentary, with the goal of the familiarizing students with the writing style of these commentators and developing the students’ skills in independently reading such material with accuracy and comprehension, The focus will initially be on the commentaries of Rashi (in so-called “Rashi script”), and then Ibn Ezra and Nachmanides. Prerequisite: Hebrew V, Introduction to Reading Biblical Literature I

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LITURGY
Workshop on Liturgical Halakhah  CG LITGY 595
M, 11:15 am-1:15 pm; Feb. 2- March 9 | 1 graduate credit Syllabus | Blank

The goal of this class is to familiarize students with textual sources they need to answer questions about liturgical and ritual practice. We will use traditional and contemporary resources in Hebrew and English.  In this workshop, each student is expected to research several sample questions and present these to their colleagues. The purpose of this class is not to learn ‘how to daven’ or the ‘right way’ to do anything, but to learn how to best arrive at one’s own answers and advise others. Students must bring to every class, including the first session:  “Luah Hashanah 5775,” Miles Cohen and Leslie Rubin (United Synagogue). This course is intended for students of the SJM, but others may enroll with instructor’s permission. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: Hebrew VI

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MUSIC
Choral Conducting: Methods & Materials for the Synagogue Musician CG MUSIC 581
M, 2:15-4:15 pm | 3 graduate credits Lieberman

The methods and materials for conducting the synagogue choir and the secular Jewish chorale are investigated through presentations by the instructor and student projects. Topics include repertoire, programming, conducting gestures, score preparation, rehearsal techniques and auditions. Prerequisite: Musicianship Skills IV

Voice Lessons CG MUSIC 200
TBA | 1 graduate credit Staff

This course consists of private lessons in singing. Emphasis is on understanding the working of the vocal mechanism, maximizing the potential of the individual singer, learning to be an effective vocal teacher, and preparing the student to be an inspiring performer. Students will be taught how to use correct technique while singing a variety of different styles of music. Students will be required to participate in a studio recital once each semester and to memorize the music that is being performed. To adjudicate progress, SJM students will also be required to sing in Vocal Boards, performing a liturgical selection either from memory or from the Hebrew text, and a secular piece from memory from repertoire to be approved in advance. A Studio Fee may be charged in addition to tuition. SJM students may repeat course multiple times for credit. Available on a for-credit basis only, no non-credit students.

Kol Arev Workshop CG MUSIC 305
1 graduate credit Lieberman

This course is for students who have successfully auditioned for and who will serve as members of Kol Arev, the Hebrew College Choir, during the academic year. SJM students may repeat course multiple times for credit.

Choir CG MUSIC 546
1 graduate credit Lieberman

Students sing or serve as conducting interns in a choir specializing in Jewish repertoire. Participation must be approved in advance with the choir coordinator. SJM students may repeat course multiple times for credit.

Senior Recital CG MUSIC 905
1 graduate credit Staff

This course will be taken instead of voice lessons during each of the final two semesters before graduation. Emphasis is on preparing the student for the senior recital. Open to cantorial students only.

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RABBINICS
Introduction to Talmud CG RAB 520
M, W; 11:30-1 pm | 4 graduate credits Rhodes

Students in this course will learn the skills of analyzing a variety of Talmudic texts, aggadic and halakhic. How are Talmudic sugyot (thematic units of a Talmudic tractate) constructed? What are the recurring technical terms of a Talmudic “discussion”? What are the conceptual assumptions of Talmudic discourse? What are the social and cultural contexts of the sugyot? Students will learn basic Talmudic terminology, including a glossary of Hebrew and Aramaic terms and concepts, and how to use dictionaries, concordances and other reference tools to decipher and understand a Talmudic sugya. This course also includes selections from the commentaries of Rashi and the Tosaphot with an examination of their interpretive concerns and methods. Students will be required to record selections from the Talmudic texts in order to improve skills in reading Rabbinic Hebrew. Some previous exposure to rabbinic literature is desirable. Prerequisite: Hebrew V; Some previous exposure to rabbinic literature is desirable

Moses in the Midrash CG RAB 541
Th, 11:15 am-1:15 pm | 3 graduate credits  Syllabus | Schimmel

Through an examination of midrashic characterizations of Moses, students will gain an understanding of the midrashic processes and its objectives and midrashic methods of scriptural interpretation; become familiar with different types of midrash and aggadah; place, where possible, the midrashic/aggadic teachings about Moses in a historical and cultural context; and enjoy the creativity of the Rabbinic imagination and the ingenuity of Rabbinic exegeses as applied to Moses. The course will be taught in English with English translations of the midrashic texts. Those who know Hebrew may use the Hebrew texts.

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