Spring 2018 Courses

Spring Session Dates: February 5 - May 18, 2018

Courses may be available as a credit-bearing course or a non-credit bearing course. There is a difference in the course numbers for credit and non-credit courses. Be sure to register using the correct course number. You will be charged according to your registration.

Course Numbers ending in C1 or NC are taught on campus; W1 or N1 are taught online; H1 is a hybrid course and may taught in some combination of both online and on campus.

Community Education Courses can be found at the end of this general listing (before the Rabbinic School section) and will have a different pricing structure than the regular credit/non-credit course. Community Education Course numbers end in AU.

Registration is not complete until you pay your tuition. Information about tuition and fees may be found here.


Education Courses

Language Courses

Jewish Studies Courses


Jewish Music Courses

Rabbinical School Courses

Community Education Courses


EDUCATION COURSES

The Jewish Calendar
Susie Rodenstein

CG-EDUC-545-W1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-545-N1 -3 non- credits
Online

This course will explore the Jewish holidays, across time and space. Participants will study Biblical, Rabbinic and contemporary sources to uncover the central themes and values, symbols, rituals and practices associated with each holiday. After reaching a deeper knowledge of their origins and central messages, we will develop a repertoire of resources and strategies appropriate to our individual educational settings and target audiences. Particular attention will be paid to the cycles of nature and the agricultural seasons, the historical milestones of the evolving Jewish People, and the ways in which our celebrations of the holidays enhance our relationships with the Divine.

Theory and Practice of Experiential Education
Lauren Applebaum

Credit Course:CG-EDUC-567-W1- 3 graduate credits
Non-Credit Course: CG-EDUC-567-N1 - 3 non-credits
Online


What makes education experiential? What makes an experience educational? This course will explore the field of (Jewish) experiential education. We will consider how experiential education is related to good educational practice and what makes it unique, focusing on the role of an experiential educator, the use of reflection, and the wide variety of settings and contexts in which Jewish experiential education might take place. Using observation, personal experience, and design experiments, we will delve into the philosophy and pedagogy of experiential education for Jewish learning. This course fulfills a pedagogic application course requirement.

Pedagogy of B'nai Mitzvah
Louise Treitman

CG-EDUC-595-C1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-595-NC - 3 non- credits
Wednesdays, 11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Prerequisites: A basic understanding of cantillation; cantillation skills will not be taught in this course.


This course is designed to enable educators working with pre-bar- and bat-mitzvah-age students to develop a curriculum to prepare them for this important lifecycle event and to develop a ceremony that reflects the individual child. Topics will include lesson planning, dealing with different learning styles, group teaching, homiletics and problem solving. The course will examine the process of this lifecycle event from a variety of viewpoints, including religious, psychological, social and historical. Participants in the course will be expected to develop a portfolio that includes lesson plans and strategies for their students. Students who are currently tutoring are encouraged to develop materials for their pupils.
Prerequisites: A basic understanding of cantillation; cantillation skills will not be taught in this course.

Models of Teaching
Susie Rodenstein

CG-EDUC-601-C1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-601-NC- 3 non-Credits
Tuesdays 2:30-4:00 p.m.


In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.

 

Faces and Fictions of Intermarriage
Keren McGinity

CG-EDUC-645-W1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-645-N1-3 non-credits
Online


Case studies of intermarried Jews dismantle assumptions about the ìother.î How can Jewish educators best welcome the stranger in light of these discrepancies? Cultural constructions of interfaith romance celebrate the American ideal of choosing whom to love and marry. The ubiquity of Jewish intermarriage plots in literature, films, and on television illustrate that interfaith relationships make appealing plot material. From Israel Zangwillís ìMelting Potî to Larry Davidís ìCurb Your Enthusiasmî, marriage between Jews and people of other faiths has fascinated producers and consumers of popular culture. This course examines the similarities and differences between fictional representations and lived experiences, from which best practices for engagement arise.

iCenter Seminar
Susie Rodenstein

CG-EDUC-685-H1- 3 graduate credits
Non-Credit Course: not available
Hybrid: Online & On Campus
Open only to those in the iCenter Fellowship Program-


As a component of the iCenter fellows program, this course prepares students for the final project of the Israel Education concentration and offers reflective practice on the teaching of Israel in schools and synagogues. iCenter fellows are required to participate fully and complete all written assignments for the iCenter as well as all requirements for this seminar. This course fulfills a pedagogic application course requirement. Open only to those in the iCenter Fellowship Program.

Seminar in Jewish Educational Leadership
Ina Regosin

CG-EDUC-710-W1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-710-N1 - 3 non credits
Online


This course explores the process of educational supervision, instructional leadership and organizational leadership in Jewish education. Students will consider and practice varied models of supervision and staff development and examine issues of change in Jewish education. In addition, students will practice Jewish educational leadership skills, including public speaking, homiletics and educational planning and problem solving. For advanced students and supervisors.

Decision Making for Special Education
Sandy Gold

CG-EDUC-736-W1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-736-N1 - 3 non-credits
Online


This course has been designed specifically for individuals working in school environments or taking an educational leadership role in a setting that involves children. Building on previous work done on neurodiversity, this course introduces students to the process of creating successful learning environments for diverse student populations through examining the decision making process that administrators and educators must think through. Together we will examine tools and techniques needed to understand the multiple facets of an inclusion setting. Using case studies and current experiences, students will have the opportunity to assess and apply strategies to plan for and create successful experiences for learners with unique needs. A requirement for this course is that each student have access to a learner for whom a case study could be created.

Theory & Practice of 21st Century Jewish Education
TBA

CG-EDUC-834-W1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-834-N1- 3 non-credit course
Online


This course explores the theories of 21st century Jewish education and ways that these theories inform practice. We will examine different tools for learning and teaching across educational venues. The course will explore how different applications support current theories in Jewish education and will also identify the pedagogic implications for integration of technology and ideas of 21st century education into learning experiences for Jewish education.

Theory & Practice of 21st Century Jewish Education
TBA

CG-EDUC-834-C1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-834-NC - 3 non-credits
On Campus - Schedule TBA


This course explores the theories of 21st century Jewish education and ways that these theories inform practice. We will examine different tools for learning and teaching across educational venues. The course will explore how different applications support current theories in Jewish education and will also identify the pedagogic implications for integration of technology and ideas of 21st century education into learning experiences for Jewish education.

 


 

JEWISH EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

Philosophies of Education and Leadership in Jewish Thought and Practice
Michael Shire


ED-JLS-902-W1- 3 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Online


The work in this course is divided into two parts. In the first part, we will examine some important modern philosophers of Jewish education, in order to become familiar with some of the different approaches in this field and the purposes of Jewish education. In the second part, we will attempt to move from these more abstract levels of reflection to contemplate concrete areas and issues in contemporary Jewish education. This will give us a chance to explore how philosophical perspectives inform educational strategies and practices, whether explicitly or implicitly; it will also provide an opportunity for students to begin to spell out their own philosophical positions on real topics in day to day Jewish education, as they contemplate their educational leadership in these areas and challenges.



PARDES EDUCATOR PROGRAM

Seminar on Jewish Day Schools
TBD

CG-EDUC-826-P1- 3 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Location to be announced


Open to those in the Pardes Program only


Students will study the unique learning contexts of Jewish day schools and the particular challenges and opportunities they present to teachers. Students will consider selected problems in teaching a curriculum that includes Jewish and general studies; integration of multiple disciplines; and intentions to foster Judaic, Hebraic and English literacy at high levels of understanding. This course is for student teachers in Jewish day schools as well as classroom teachers who are at the early stages of their careers in Jewish day-school training.

 


EDUCATIONAL FIELD EXPERIENCE 

Field Experience II
Susan Morrel


CG-EDUC-916-C1 - 1 graduate credit
Non-credit not available
Year Long (Covers two semester: spring and summer)
DATES TBD


Supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required over two semesters. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All field experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education and Field Experience I.


LANGUAGE COURSES 

HEBREW ON CAMPUS 
Hebrew 6

Adva Alpert


CG-HEBRW-206-C1-4 graduate credits
CG-HEBRW-206-NC- 4 non-credits
Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 am - 11:30 am
Prerequisite: Hebrew 5


In the Academic Modern Hebrew 6 course, students will continue to develop in each Modern Language skill area: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Intermediate to advanced level content will be covered: Gízarot in the verb system; advanced vocabulary and idiomatic expressions within Hebrew text, which will be taught with a lens into the classical texts; next step syntax templates and vocabulary, will be implemented as well. Genres are diverse (academic scientific articles, lit reviews, editorials, poetry, songs) representing the multi historical layers of our Hebrew language. Spoken Modern Hebrew is used in all meetings. Prerequisite: Hebrew 5.

Biblical Hebrew
Harvey Bock


CG-HEBRW-207-C1- 2 graduate credits
CG-HEBRW-207-NC- 2 non-credits
Mondays, 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Prerequisite: Hebrew grammar intensive or equivalent.


This course is intended to equip students for precise and nuanced reading of Biblical Hebrew and explores important features of the phonology, morphology and syntax of Biblical Hebrew. A thorough prior knowledge of basic Hebrew grammar, including the system of niqqud and the verb system, is presumed. Prerequisite: Hebrew grammar intensive or equivalent.

Rabbinic Hebrew
Harvey Bock


CG-HEBRW-208-C1- 2 graduate credits
CG-HEBRW-208-NC- 2 non-credits
Thursdays, 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Prerequisite: Hebrew 7 or above


This course surveys the Hebrew of classic rabbinic works, with the goal of refining the studentís ability to accurately read and understand the language of major genres of post-biblical literature. Representative texts from the Mishnah through medieval biblical commentary and law are examined sequentially. Secondary literature about the Hebrew of the genres covered is also read and discussed.

 

ULPAN HEBREW ON CAMPUS

Courses will meet: February 9 -- May 18, 2018


The Ulpan program uses the linguistic-immersion method developed and popularized in Israel, and is a full-language program that teaches grammar, reading comprehension and conversation skills. Ulpan is offered through nine levels of study, mornings or evenings, and all courses are offered non-credit. Ulpan for credit is offered by special permission.
For a complete listing of class dates, times and information including credit pricing, please see the Ulpan webpage.

 

MODERN HEBREW LANGUAGE ONLINE


All classes are offered for non-credit. College undergraduate credit may be available for certain classes ñ contact Admissions at admissions@hebrewcollege.edu.High school students who wish to take Hebrew online must contact the coordinator of online Hebrew, Ms. Michal Levy, at mlevy@hebrewcollege.edu, before registering for any class.Any student wishing to enroll in a Hebrew level above Mekhina (Preparation) must take the free online placement test. All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language
Shir Twersky

Not available for credit
Non-Credit Course: CU-HEBRW-015-N1
Prerequisite: proficient in Hebrew alphabet and vowels.


The Mekhina course prepares students to participate in Hebrew College's online Hebrew courses by providing a basic foundation. Assuming a rudimentary reading level, the program systematically reinforces Hebrew reading while also providing basic vocabulary and grammar, including gender and number agreement in Hebrew nouns and verbs, the conjugation of select verbs in the present tense, and the use of specific interrogative words, prepositions, and conjunctions. The program utilizes a proficiency approach to Hebrew learning, providing opportunities to encounter authentic learning materials in written, audio, and video formats in both receptive and expressive modes. The Mekhina program focuses on everyday language relating to personal introductions, food and eating, transportation, and even some Hebrew slang. Prerequisite: proficient in Hebrew alphabet and vowels

Hebrew Level 1A
Moriyah Green

Not available for credit
CU-HEBRW-115A-N1- non-credit course
Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina Course or placement test.


This Hebrew course provides students with opportunities to improve their Hebrew proficiency by encountering ìauthenticî Hebrew sources relating to real estate, Israeli geography, the shuk (Israeli outdoor market), the supermarket, and the mall. The course focuses on the use of present tense verbs, use of the infinitive form of verbs, recognition of past tense verbs, use of cardinal numbers, number and gender agreement between nouns and adjectives including numbers, the use of interrogative words and conjunctions, and basic Hebrew syntax. Students also learn about Israeli culture by listening to popular Israeli music, viewing segments of Israeli television programs and documentary clips, and learning about Israeli currency. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina Course or placement test.

Hebrew Level 1B
Moriyah Green

Not available for credit
CU-HEBRW-115B-N1
Prerequisite: Hebrew1A or placement test.


Hebrew Level 1B emphasizes immersion in the language for the purpose of absorbing and acquiring the language naturally. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce students to authentic Hebrew language materials including videos, music, poetry, texts etc. Students use online applications such as wizer to respond to real life situations and scenarios in Hebrew demonstrating growing proficiency in reading, speaking, comprehension and writing. Materials used develop knowledge of contemporary Israeli culture as well as Jewish life. Assessment tools are built into the platform allowing students to see evidence of their own progress. In addition, a weekly online face-to-face oral Hebrew session is hosted by the instructor for the class group and is a requirement of the course.

 

Hebrew Levels 2, 3 and 4 are offered in both a "fast track" that completes a level in a semester and a "regular track" that completes the level in two semesters (i.e. levels 1A/B, 2A/B, 3A/B, or 4A/B). Required text for the following classes is Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch).

 

Hebrew 2
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-210-W1 4 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-210-N1-4 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.


Hebrew 2 classes emphasize reading, writing, speaking and comprehension. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce the exercises and drills for mastery of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. Students complete the work in weekly assignments and submit responses to the instructor. In addition, the instructor hosts a weekly face-to-face online Hebrew conversation group for students at the same level. Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.


Hebrew 2 classes emphasize reading, writing, speaking and comprehension. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce the exercises and drills for mastery of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. Students complete the work in weekly assignments and submit responses to the instructor. In addition, the instructor hosts a weekly face-to-face online Hebrew conversation group for students at the same level.
Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1. Hebrew 2 covers Lessons 15-28 in the textbook

Hebrew 2A
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-211A-W1-2 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-211A-N1-2 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.


This course covers the first half of Hebrew 2, Lessons 15-21 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.

Hebrew 2B
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-211B-W12-2 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-211B-N1-2 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.


This course covers the second half of Hebrew 2, Lessons 22-28 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.

Hebrew 3
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-310-W1- 4 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-310-N1- 4 non-credits
Online

Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.


Hebrew 3 classes emphasize reading, writing, speaking and comprehension. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce the exercises and drills for mastery of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. Students complete the work in weekly assignments and submit responses to the instructor. In addition, the instructor hosts a weekly face-to-face online Hebrew conversation group for students at the same level.

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew 3 covers Lessons 1-8 in the textbook.

 

Hebrew 3A
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-311A-W12- 2 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-311A-N1- 2 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.


This course covers the first half of Hebrew 3, Lessons 1-4 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

Hebrew 3B
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-311B-W1- 2 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-311B-N1- 2 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.


This course covers the second half of Hebrew 3, Lessons 5-8 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

Hebrew 4
Michal Levy


CU-HEBRW-410-W1- 4 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-410-N1- 4 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.

Hebrew 4 classes emphasize reading, writing, speaking and comprehension. The online platform Schoology is used to introduce the exercises and drills for mastery of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. Students complete the work in weekly assignments and submit responses to the instructor. In addition, the instructor hosts a weekly face-to-face online Hebrew conversation group for students at the same level.

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew 4 covers Lessons 9-16 in the textbook.

Hebrew 4A
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-411A-W1- 2 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-411A-N1- 2 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.


This course covers the first half of Hebrew 4, Lessons 9-12 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

Hebrew 4B
Michal Levy


CU-HEBRW-411B-W1- 2 undergraduate credits
CU-HEBRW-411B-N1- 2 non-credits
Online
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.


This course covers the second half of Hebrew 4, Lessons 13-16 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

 


JEWISH STUDIES COURSES (INCLUDES RABBINIC SCHOOL COURSES OPEN TO THE PUBLIC)

TEXT COURSES

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature
Rachel Adelman

CG-BIBLE-502B-C1- 3 graduate credits
CG-BIBLE-502B-NC- 3 non-credits
Thursdays, 2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above

This course entails an introduction to the full complement of Biblical poetry, in its literary and historical context, and to modes of poetic interpretation and analysis. The course will cover selections from the Torah, Psalms, Proverbs, and the Book of Job, as well as selections from the Prophets such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah. We will discuss poetry imbedded within narrative, genres of Prophetic writings, apocalyptic revelations, and wisdom literature. Second part of a two-semester sequence.

Introduction to Reading Rabbinic Literature
Harvey Bock

RB-LITER-501-C1-2 graduate credits
RB-LITER-501-NC- 2 non-credits
Fridays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above

A practical introduction to the reading of rabbinic texts, this course will provide an opportunity for students to apply to such texts the general Hebrew skills that they are concurrently developing. Students will prepare texts from Rashiís commentary on the Tanakh, and these will be carefully reviewed in class. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above.

Hilkhot Tefilah
Shayna Rhodes

RB-RAB-518-C1-2 graduate credits
RB-RAB-518-NC- 2 non-credits
Thursdays 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

This course will introduce students to primary halachic texts relating to tefila in terms of personal practice and prayer leadership. We will study both Ashkenazi and Sephardic sources that explore the traditional obligations one has as a Jew and as a leader with regard to tefila. What are the daily obligations? What are the required characteristics of a shaliach tzibbur? What are the rules surrounding the reading of Torah to the community? We will begin to think about all of these questions as we experiment with practice and look around our school and our local communities to see how tefila is lived in our surrounding environment.

Introduction to Talmud
Shayna Rhodes

CG-RAB-520-C1- 4 graduate credits
CG-RAB-520-NC- 4 non-credits
Mondays, 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. and Wednesdays, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above

Students in this course will learn the skills of analyzing a variety of Talmudic texts, aggadic and halakhic. How are Talmudic sugyot (thematic units of a Talmudic tractate) constructed? What are the recurring technical terms of a Talmudic ìdiscussionî? What are the conceptual assumptions of Talmudic discourse? What are the social and cultural contexts of the sugyot? Students will learn basic Talmudic terminology, including a glossary of Hebrew and Aramaic terms and concepts, and how to use dictionaries, concordances and other reference tools to decipher and understand a Talmudic sugya. This course also includes selections from the commentaries of Rashi and the Tosaphot with an examination of their interpretive concerns and methods. Students will be required to record selections from the Talmudic texts in order to improve skills in reading Rabbinic Hebrew. Some previous exposure to rabbinic literature is desirable.

JEWISH THOUGHT 

Classical Jewish Thought
Arthur Green

RB-JTHT-318-C1-2 graduate credits
RB-JTHT-318-NC-2 non-credits
Mondays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Images, concepts, and articulations on the key themes of Jewish theology: God, creation and revelation, as they developed through biblical and rabbinic sources. Readings in primary and secondary sources, including A. J. Heschelís Heavenly Torah.

Medieval Jewish Thought
Nehemia Polen

CG-JTHT-519-C1- 2 graduate credits
CG-JTHT-519-NC- 2 non-credits
Thursdays, 9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

This course introduces major medieval thinkers and their enduring contributions to scriptural interpretation, law, ethics, philosophy, ritual, mysticism and theology. Main figures include:

  • Rashi-- his work as biblical exegete, anthologist, Talmudic commentator and pedagogue.
  • Judah Halevi--his vision of Jewish history and role on world stage, as well as views on Hebrew language, prophecy, mitzvot, Land of Israel, prophecy; Haleviís poetry.
  • Maimonides--unparalleled codifier of Talmudic law; magisterial philosopher and theologian; mishnaic commentator and community leader.
  • Nahmanides--master expositor of biblical narrative; kabbalist responsible for bringing kabbalistic thinking into the rabbinic mainstream.
  • Zoharic literature--theurgy, symbolism, ta'amei ha-mitzvot; the ongoing influence and development of the Jewish mystical tradition.

As time allows, we will look at other genres such as piyyut (sacred poetry), polemical literature (both intra-Jewish and against other religions), and ethical treatises.

 

Modern Jewish Thought
Dan Judson

RB-JTHT-538-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-JTHT-538-NC- 2 non-credits
Tuesdays 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

This course will explore the writings of major Jewish thinkers living in the modern era and place them in the context of their historical setting. The class will focus on the various ways these thinkers ñ from Mendelssohn to Buber ñ understood the dynamic relationship between inherited tradition and modern conceptions of religious life.

Contemporary Jewish Thought
Dan Judson

RB-JTHT-518-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-JTHT-318-NC- 2 non-credits
Wednesdays, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Level: Year 5

This course has two components. In the first half of the semester we will explore American Jewish history focusing on themes of particular importance to rabbinical students like the emergence of denominations and the evolution of the American synagogue. The second half of the course is a survey of the seminal Jewish thinkers who wrote in an American context such as Mordecai Kaplan, Abraham Joshua Heschel, Joseph Soloveitchik, Judith Plaskow and others.
We will ultimately be aiming to place our own historical moment and our own theologies within broader historical/theological frameworks.

The Tales of Rabbi Nahman
Arthur Green and Jordan Schuster

RB-JTHT-611-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-JTHT-611-NC- 2 non-credits
Mondays, 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav (1772-1810) was a Hasidic master who combined intellectual brilliance with a creative and strongly mythic imagination. His Tales are considered classics of early modern Jewish literature. The course will focus on several of his stories, reading closely to try to penetrate both his intent in telling them and messages that we, his latter-day readers, need to hear in them. Background reading will be the instructorís book: Tormented Master: A Life of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav.Hebrew is not required for this course. However, special sessions, involving the Hebrew texts, will be scheduled for rabbinical students and others who have the requisite skills.

The Problem of Evil in Jewish Thought
Edward Breuer

CG-JTHT-560-W1-4 graduate credits
CG-JTHT-560-NC-4 non-credits
Online

Throughout the history of Western religious thought, perhaps the most enduring issue has been ìthe problem of evil.î What kind of relationship can God, the creator of the universe, have with the evil that exists in the world? Where does it come from and who bears responsibility for it? The course will provide an opportunity to examine the responses of the Jewish tradition to these and other related issues.

Leadership on the Line: Critical Conversations with Religious Activists & Organizers
Rabbi Or Rose

RB-INTD-565-C1-2 graduate credits
RB-INTD-565-NC- 2 non-credits
Wednesdays, 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
(Open to all students)

In this course, we will encounter several outstanding modern and contemporary religious leaders engaged in various civic and political initiatives for social and environmental transformation. This will include reading works by and about such historical figures as Dorothy Day, Martin Luther King, Jr., Abraham Joshua Heschel and Oscar Romero, and meeting (in-person and by video conference) with leaders from the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization, American Jewish World Service, and GreenFaith. Through these encounters, we will explore core leadership capacities, organizational structures, and practices for personal growth and sustainability.

GRADUATE SEMINARS 

Graduate Research Seminar
Barry Mesch

CG-INTD-601-H1-2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Wednesdays, 2:30-4 p.m.

Hybrid: Online & On Campus
Required of all MAJS and MJLS students graduating in spring 2018

Students will complete work on their masterís papers and discuss research methods and approaches to the field. At the end of the course, students will present the results of their research to the Hebrew College community in a public forum. Note: Required of all students in the graduate Jewish Studies or Jewish Liberal Studies programs. This course is usually taken during the spring semester prior to graduation. 

HISTORY

Jewish Music History 2
Joshua Jacobson

CG-MUSIC-506-C13-3 Graduate credits
CG-MUSIC-506-NC-3 non-credits
Tuesdays, 11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

This course provides a detailed look at music composed by Jews as Jews from the nineteenth century to the dawn of the twenty-first century. Students not only examine music for its own intrinsic structure, but also consider it in the context of its cultural milieu. Study involves harmonic, melodic and formal analysis of selected compositions, as well as historical analysis through close reading of primary sources. Prerequisite: Jewish Music History I.

Music of the Jewish People
Judy Pinnolis

CG-MUSIC-501-W1-3 graduate credits
CG-MUSIC-501-AU- Community Ed Option
Online


This online course investigates the role that music has played in Jewish life from ancient to modern times. Topics include music in the time of the Bible, rabbinic attitudes toward music, music and mysticism, the development of the modes for prayer and scriptural cantillation, church and synagogue music compared, music of the holidays and the life cycle, folk and popular music in the Diaspora, the development of art music in the modern era, and music in modern Israel. Prior knowledge of music is not required.

Second Temple and Early Rabbinic Judaism
Jonathan Klawans

CG-HIST-151-C1-2 graduate credits
CG-HIST-151-NC-2 non-credits
Tuesdays, 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

This course is a survey of the diversity and development of Judaism in the ancient world, covering some of the events and phenomena that shaped ancient Judaism: the impact of Hellenism, the Maccabean revolt and the Roman conquest. Some course time is devoted to the first century of the Common Era-the important period that saw both the birth of Christianity and the destruction of the ancient Jewish state, which in turn gave way to the beginnings of rabbinic civilization.

History and Memory: Medieval & Modern Periods
Barry Mesch

CG-HIST-534-W1-3 graduate credits
CG-HIST-534-AU- Community Ed Option
Online

Working within a chronological framework, this course will trace the creative transformation of Judaism and the Jewish people in the medieval period and the profound challenges posed by modernity. Students will have the opportunity to critically engage with primary sources. Major events and personalities of these two historical periods will be considered. Research methods and approaches to Jewish Studies and Jewish history will be examined.

LITURGY 

Liturgy and Poetry of Yamim Noraim
Allan Lehmann

RB-LITGY-225-C1-2 graduate credits
RB-LITGY-225-NC-2 non-credits
Fridays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above. Texts will be taught in Hebrew.


Students will study the classic liturgy for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, including the history of the mahzor and close reading of piyyutim (liturgical poetry).Texts will be taught in Hebrew.

Workshop on Liturgical Halakhah
Debra Reed Blank

CG-LITGY-595-C1- 1 graduate credit
CG-LITGY-595-NC- 1 non-credit
Tuesdays, 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
(5 sessions only -- meeting Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27 and Mar. 6)
This course is intended for students of the SJM, but others may enroll with instructor's permission. Required level Hebrew 6. Enrollment is limited to 8 students.

The goal of this class is to familiarize students with the sources they need to answer questions about contemporary liturgical practice. We will use traditional and contemporary resources in Hebrew and English. In this workshop, each student will be expected to research fully several sample questions and present these to their colleagues. The purpose of this class is not to learn ëhow to davení or the ëright wayí to do anything, but to learn how to best arrive at oneís own answers and advise others. This course is intended for students of the SJM, but others may enroll with instructorís permission. Required level Hebrew 6. Enrollment is limited to 8 students.

BASIC HOW-TO COURSES 

Basic Cantillation B

Louise Treitman

RB-CANTR-519B-C1- 1 graduate credit
RB-CANTR-519B-NC- 1 non-credit
Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above or permission of Instructor required for non-rabbinic students. Will not count for credit for COSEL students.


This class is a continuation of the introduction to the basic concepts of Torah cantillation. Emphasis will be placed on continuing to acquire the skills needed to chant Torah on weekdays, Sabbaths and Festivals using a common Ashkenazi trope. Topics will also include the rituals surrounding the Torah service, the history of cantillation/trope, correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew, and the underlying syntactic structure of the system of cantillation. While this course is primarily for rabbinical students, others are welcome (depending on size of the class), provided they have adequate sense of musical pitch and the ability to read and translate biblical Hebrew. Course does not count for graduate credit for students in the Cantorial Ordination programs, although Mekorot cantorial students are welcome to register and participate. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above or permission of Instructor required for non-rabbinic students.

Introduction to Basic Nusach B
Lynn Torgove

RB-CANTR-522B-C1- 1 graduate credit
RB-CANTR-522B-NC- 1 non-credit
Wednesdays, 9:30 am - 10:30 am
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor required for non-rabbinic students. Will not count for credit for COSEL students.

This class is an introduction to the modes and motifs for synagogue prayer. This semester we will be focusing on Sabbath worship. Emphasis will be on basic proficiency in traditional prayer leading, rudimentary musical skills and an introduction to the liturgical structure Shabbat services.

JEWISH MUSIC 

Basic Nusach

Lynn Torgove

CG-CANTR-517-C1- 3 graduate credits
CG-CANTR-517-NC- 3 non-credits
Fridays, 9:00 - 11:00 a.m.
COSEL students should take this course

This class is an introduction to the modes and motifs for synagogue prayer during weekday and Sabbath worship. Emphasis is on acquiring the skills needed to teach basic davening. Discussions also examine some theoretical and pedagogical issues in the teaching of prayer to children.

Cantorial Coaching
Instructor to be assigned for each student

CG-CANTR-579-C1- 1 graduate credit
Non-credit not available
Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the SJM program or by permission of the SJM.

This course provides coaching by a practicing cantor who will guide the student according to his or her individual needs. Goals of coaching are to increase facility with prayer leading and to improve vocal and musical interpretations of selected repertoire as pertains to the Jewish Life Cycle. The student will be evaluated on the benchmark requirements by the third year of residency to ascertain proficiency. Enrollment is limited to students who have successfully auditioned into one of the SJM program or by permission of the SJM. May be repeated for credit.

Cantorial Internship 2
Instructor assigned for each student

CE-CANTR-922-C1- 1 graduate credit
Non-credit not available
Prerequisite: Cantorial Internship 1
Open to COSEL students only


Students spend a semester on location in a synagogue, working with a practicing cantor, with opportunities for leading services and or various teaching situations. The on-site cantor meets with and coaches the student in the practical application of skills learned in the classroom. Prerequisite: Cantorial Internship 1.

Voice Lessons
Instructor to be assigned for each student

CG-MUSIC-200-C1- 1 credit
Non-credit not available
Enrollment by non-SJM degree students is allowed only with permission from the Head of Vocal Arts and will require payment of a studio fee in addition to tuition and registration fee.

Private lessons in singing. Emphasis is on understanding the working of the vocal mechanism, maximizing the potential of the individual singer, learning to be an effective vocal teacher, and preparing the student to be an inspiring performer. Students will be taught how to use correct technique while singing a variety of different styles of music. Students will be required to participate in a studio recital once each semester and to memorize the music that is being performed. To adjudicate progress, cantorial students will also be required to sing in Vocal Boards, performing a liturgical selection either from memory or from the Hebrew text, and a secular piece from memory from repertoire to be approved in advance. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment by non-SJM degree students is with permission from the Head of Vocal Arts, and will require payment of a studio fee.

Kol Arev Chamber Choir
Amy Lieberman

Credit not available
CG-MUSIC-305-NC- non credit
Mondays, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Only COSEL students are required to register for this course.

This ensemble is open to students who have successfully auditioned for and who will serve as members of Kol Arev Chamber Ensemble during the academic year. Participation is required for students in the COSEL program, and only students in the COSEL program should register for this course.

Senior Recital
Instructor to be assigned for each student

CE-MUSIC-905-C1-1 graduate credit
Non-credit not Available
Open only to COSEL students during their final year

Private lessons in singing. Emphasis is on preparing the student for the senior recital. This course will be taken instead of voice lessons during final two semesters before graduation. May be repeated for credit.

 


 

COMMUNITY EDUCATION COURSES 

These courses are open to the general community as non-credit (audit) courses at a considerable tuition discount. Only the Community Education Discount will apply to these courses. The course number used when registering must end in AU.

Tuition is $500 for each community education course, plus one registration fee of $55 per semester. The tuition & fee are due when the student registers.

History and Memory: Medieval & Modern Periods
Barry Mesch

CG-HIST-534-AU
Online

Working within a chronological framework, this course will trace the creative transformation of Judaism and the Jewish people in the medieval period and the profound challenges posed by modernity. Students will have the opportunity to critically engage with primary sources. Major events and personalities of these two historical periods will be considered. Research methods and approaches to Jewish Studies and Jewish history will be examined.

Music of the Jewish People
Judy Pinnolis

CG-MUSIC-501-AU
Online

This online course investigates the role that music has played in Jewish life from ancient to modern times. Topics include music in the time of the Bible, rabbinic attitudes toward music, music and mysticism, the development of the modes for prayer and scriptural cantillation, church and synagogue music compared, music of the holidays and the life cycle, folk and popular music in the Diaspora, the development of art music in the modern era, and music in modern Israel. Prior knowledge of music is not required.

 


RABBINICAL SCHOOL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

Please note: Courses offered by the Rabbinical School are not be open to everyone. If the course is listed in the general listings or community education listing as well as here, then it is open to non-rabbinic and non-cantorial students. BTI students should contact dean of Rabbinic School for permission to take courses which are only listed below and not in the general or community listings.

 

BIBLE 

Core Text and Torah 1: Bereshit 2
Rachel Adelman

RB-BIBLE-101-C1- 4 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Wednesdays, 2:00-3:30 p.m. and Fridays, 11:30 am - 1:00 p.m.
Level: Year 1

This second half of Bereshit covers the Jacob Saga and Joseph and His Brothers. Colorful coats, dreams and near fratricide, bedtricks, famine and exile mark these dramatic narratives. This course will engage in a careful reading of the biblical text, drawing on classic medieval exegetes and midrash, as well as modern literary readings, from Robert Alter and Israeli poetry to Thomas Mann's great novel, Joseph and His Brothers. In addition to honing our text skills, we will consider various themes such as the problem of continuity/discontinuity (toledot), dreams and their interpretation, models of recognition and teshuvah, shame and reconciliation.

Hamesh Megillot with Beit Midrash
Rachel Adelman

RB-BIBLE-250-C1- 2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Level: 3
Tuesdays, 9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

In this course students will engage a deep reading of three of the Five Megillot: Esther, Song of Songs, and the Book of Ruth. We will consider the historical context and genre of their composition, as well as their significance with respect to the liturgical year (Purim, Passover, and Shavuot). Special attention will be given to the dramatic presentation and character development, along with accompanying classical parshanut, midrash, literary commentary, and modern creative responses to these texts.

Core Text and Torah 3: Vayikra
Nehemia Polen

RB-BIBLE-300-C1-2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Thursdays, 11:30 am ñ 1:00 p.m.
Level: Year 4

Standing at the very center of the Pentateuch, Vayikra reveals the priestly view of the relationship between God and Israel, and the interconnected dimensions of sacred time, space, and person. We will study major themes of Vayikra including the sacrificial system, the numinous power of the divine Presence, purity and impurity, the relationship between personal and social embodiment, the meaning of sacred time, and the interplay of the ritual and the ethical. We shall attempt to understand Vayikra's theory of priesthood, including the paradox of self-referentiality and the paradox of initiation.

Attention will be given to the role of Vayikra in the context of the Pentateuch as a whole, with special focus on narrative elements such as the death of Aaron's sons on the Tabernacle's inaugural day. We will apply insights from anthropology, comparative theology, and the contributions of modern scholars, but our main emphasis will be a close and careful reading of the text, assisted by classical commentators including Rashi, Ramban and Seforno.

Core Text and Torah 2: Shemot 2 -The Book of Exodus in Hasidic Imagination
Shayna Rhodes

RB-BIBLE-413-C1- 4 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:30 am - 1:00 p.m.
Level: Year 2

This course will examine the book of Exodus post slavery. We will focus on the main events in the wilderness: Sinai, the golden calf, and the Tabernacle. We will look primarily through the lens of classic rabbinic exegesis, but will spend some time exploring critical approaches as well. Additionally we will trace Mosheís development as a leader and his relationship with God and the people of Israel.

Genres and Themes of Biblical Literature
Rachel Adelman


CG-BIBLE-502B-C1- 3 graduate credits
CG-BIBLE-502B-NC- 3 non-credits
Thursdays, 2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Level: Mekorot

CANTILLATION COURSES

Basic Cantillation B
Louise Treitman

RB-CANTR-519B-C1- 1 graduate credit
RB-CANTR-519B-NC- 1 non-credit
Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.
Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above or permission of Instructor required for non-rabbinic students

This class is a continuation of the introduction to the basic concepts of Torah cantillation. Emphasis will be placed on continuing to acquire the skills needed to chant Torah on weekdays, Sabbaths and Festivals using a common Ashkenazi trope. Topics will also include the rituals surrounding the Torah service, the history of cantillation/trope, correct contemporary pronunciation of biblical Hebrew, and the underlying syntactic structure of the system of cantillation. While this course is primarily for rabbinical students, others are welcome (depending on size of the class), provided they have adequate sense of musical pitch and the ability to read and translate biblical Hebrew. Course does not count for graduate credit for students in the Cantorial Ordination programs, although Mekorot cantorial students are welcome to register and participate. Prerequisite: Hebrew 4 or above or permission of Instructor required for non-rabbinic students.

Introduction to Basic Nusach B
Lynn Torgove

RB-CANTR-522B-C1- 1 graduate credit
RB-CANTR-522B-NC- 1 non-credit
Wednesdays, 9:30 am - 10:30 am
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor required for non-rabbinic students

This class is an introduction to the modes and motifs for synagogue prayer. This semester we will be focusing on Sabbath worship. Emphasis will be on basic proficiency in traditional prayer leading, rudimentary musical skills and an introduction to the liturgical structure Shabbat services.

EDUCATION

Models of Teaching
Susie Rodenstein

CG-EDUC-601-C1- 3 graduate credits
CG-EDUC-601-NC- 3 non-credits
Tuesdays 2:30-4:00 p.m.

In this course, students will analyze a wide repertoire of teaching models in Jewish education, influenced by content, students and institutional contexts, which represent techniques, philosophical approaches and values of teachers. The course will examine rationales for choosing or adapting different models and students will practice alternative approaches. Features of lesson planning and how to structure lessons and courses for Jewish educational settings will also be considered. In addition, students will reflect on their own teaching experiences and collaboratively assess alternative ways to address the range of educational issues that they encounter.This course entails an introduction to the full complement of Biblical poetry, in its literary and historical context, and to modes of poetic interpretation and analysis. The course will cover selections from the Torah, Psalms, Proverbs, and the Book of Job, as well as selections from the Prophets such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah. We will discuss poetry imbedded within narrative, genres of Prophetic writings, apocalyptic revelations, and wisdom literature. Second part of a two-semester sequence.

 

HEBREW LANGUAGE

Hebrew 6
Adva Alpert

CG-HEBRW-206-C1-4 graduate credits
CG-HEBRW-206-NC-4 non-credits
Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 am - 11:30 am
Level: Mekorot
Prerequisite: Hebrew 5

In the Academic Modern Hebrew 6 course, students will continue to develop in each Modern Language skill area: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Intermediate to advanced level content will be covered: Gízarot in the verb system; advanced vocabulary and idiomatic expressions within Hebrew text, which will be taught with a lens into the classical texts; next step syntax templates and vocabulary, will be implemented as well. Genres are diverse (academic scientific articles, lit reviews, editorials, poetry, songs) representing the multi historical layers of our Hebrew language. Spoken Modern Hebrew is used in all meetings. Prerequisite: Hebrew 5

Biblical Hebrew
Harvey Bock

CG-HEBRW-207-C1- 2 graduate credits
CG-HEBRW-207-NC-2 non-credits
Mondays, 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Level: 1

This course is intended to equip students for precise and nuanced reading of Biblical Hebrew and explores important features of the phonology, morphology and syntax of Biblical Hebrew. A thorough prior knowledge of basic Hebrew grammar, including the system of niqqud and the verb system, is presumed. Prerequisite: Hebrew Grammar Intensive or equivalent.

Rabbinic Hebrew
Harvey Bock

CG-HEBRW-208-C1- 2 graduate credits
CG-HEBRW-208-NC-2 non-credits
Thursdays, 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Level: 2

This course surveys the Hebrew of classic rabbinic works, with the goal of refining the studentís ability to accurately read and understand the language of major genres of post-biblical literature. Representative texts from the Mishnah through medieval biblical commentary and law are examined sequentially. Secondary literature about the Hebrew of the genres covered is also read and discussed.

HISTORY

Second Temple and Early Rabbinic Judaism

Jonathan Klawans

CG-HIST-151-C1-2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Tuesdays, 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Level: Mekorot

This course is a survey of the diversity and development of Judaism in the ancient world, covering some of the events and phenomena that shaped ancient Judaism: the impact of Hellenism, the Maccabean revolt and the Roman conquest. Some course time is devoted to the first century of the Common Era-the important period that saw both the birth of Christianity and the destruction of the ancient Jewish state, which in turn gave way to the beginnings of rabbinic civilization.

INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 

Jewish Practice Seminar 2
TBD

RB-INTD-016-C1- 2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Tuesdays, 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Level: Mekorot

A continuation of this course begun in the fall, this course introduces aspiring rabbis to basic sources, practices and complexities of the Jewish sacred calendar. Students will gain fluency in the essential terminology of the Jewish calendar and will explore multiple approaches to Jewish ritual observance. We will integrate primary text study, secondary readings and reflections on our own personal encounters with ritual practice in order to build fluency and comfort in the practice of Judaism. We will also pay particular attention to the issue of encountering this material as future rabbis and educators.

Beit Midrash
Beit Midrash Staff
Level: All

Monday - Friday, 9:00 am - 11:15 am plus other times
Mekorot RB-INTD-051-NC- Not available for credit
Year 1 RB INTD-101-NC- Not available for credit
Year 2 RB INTD-201-NC- Not available for credit

HAVUROT
Staff

RB-INTD-175-NC- Not available for credit
Replaces Tefilah Groups INTD-150
Wednesdays, 9:00 a.m. - 10:40 a.m.

This course is required for all rabbinical students; optional for cantorial ordination students.

Leadership on the Line: Critical Conversations with Religious Activists & Organizers
Rabbi Or Rose

RB-INTD-565-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-INTD-565-NC- 2 non-credits
Wednesdays, 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
(Open to all students)

In this course, we will encounter several outstanding modern and contemporary religious leaders engaged in various civic and political initiatives for social and environmental transformation. This will include reading works by and about such historical figures as Dorothy Day, Martin Luther King, Jr., Abraham Joshua Heschel and Oscar Romero, and meeting (in-person and by video conference) with leaders from the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization, American Jewish World Service, and GreenFaith. Through these encounters, we will explore core leadership capacities, organizational structures, and practices for personal growth and sustainability.

JEWISH THOUGHT

Classical Jewish Thought
Arthur Green

RB-JTHT-318-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-JTHT-318-NC- 2 non-credits

Mondays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Level: Year 1

Images, concepts, and articulations on the key themes of Jewish theology: God, creation and revelation, as they developed through biblical and rabbinic sources. Readings in primary and secondary sources, including A. J. Heschel's Heavenly Torah.

Contemporary Jewish Thought
Dan Judson

RB-JTHT-518-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-JTHT-318-NC- 2 non-credits
Wednesdays, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Level: Year 5

This course has two components. In the first half of the semester we will explore American Jewish history focusing on themes of particular importance to rabbinical students like the emergence of denominations and the evolution of the American synagogue. The second half of the course is a survey of the seminal Jewish thinkers who wrote in an American context such as Mordecai Kaplan, Abraham Joshua Heschel, Joseph Soloveitchik, Judith Plaskow and others. We will ultimately be aiming to place our own historical moment and our own theologies within broader historical/theological frameworks.

Medieval Jewish Thought
Nehemia Polen

CG-JTHT-519-C1- 2 graduate credits
CG-JTHT-519-NC- 2 non-credits
Thursdays, 9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Level: Year 3

This course introduces major medieval thinkers and their enduring contributions to scriptural interpretation, law, ethics, philosophy, ritual, mysticism and theology. Main figures include

  • Rashi-- his work as biblical exegete, anthologist, Talmudic commentator and pedagogue.
  • Judah Halevi--his vision of Jewish history and role on world stage, as well as views on Hebrew language, prophecy, mitzvot, Land of Israel, prophecy; Haleviís poetry.
  • Maimonides--unparalleled codifier of Talmudic law; magisterial philosopher and theologian; mishnaic commentator and community leader.
  • Nahmanides--master expositor of biblical narrative; kabbalist responsible for bringing kabbalistic thinking into the rabbinic mainstream.
  • Zoharic literature--theurgy, symbolism, ta'amei ha-mitzvot; the ongoing influence and development of the Jewish mystical tradition.

Modern Jewish Thought
Dan Judson

RB-JTHT-538-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-JTHT-538-NC-2 non-credits
Tuesdays 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Level: Year 4


This course will explore the writings of major Jewish thinkers living in the modern era and place them in the context of their historical setting. The class will focus on the various ways these thinkers -- from Mendelssohn to Buber -- understood the dynamic relationship between inherited tradition and modern conceptions of religious life.

The Tales of Rabbi Nahman
Arthur Green and Jordan Schuster

RB-JTHT-611-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-JTHT-611-NC- 2 non-credits
Mondays, 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Hebrew is not required for this course. However, special sessions, involving the Hebrew texts, will be scheduled for rabbinical students and others who have the requisite skills.

Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav (1772-1810) was a Hasidic master who combined intellectual brilliance with a creative and strongly mythic imagination. His Tales are considered classics of early modern Jewish literature. The course will focus on several of his stories, reading closely to try to penetrate both his intent in telling them and messages that we, his latter-day readers, need to hear in them. Background reading will be the instructorís book: Tormented Master: A Life of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav.
Hebrew is not required for this course. However, special sessions, involving the Hebrew texts, will be scheduled for rabbinical students and others who have the requisite skills.

LITERATURE

Introduction to Reading Rabbinic Literature
Harvey Bock

RB-LITER-501-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-LITER-501-NC- 2 non-credits
Fridays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Level: Mekorot

A practical introduction to the reading of rabbinic texts, this course will provide an opportunity for students to apply to such texts the general Hebrew skills that they are concurrently developing. Students will prepare texts from Rashi's commentary on the Tanakh, and these will be carefully reviewed in class.

LITURGY

Liturgy and Poetry of Yamim Noraim
Allan Lehmann

RB-LITGY-225-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-LITGY-225-NC- 2 non-credits
Fridays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Level: 2
Texts will be taught in Hebrew

Students will study the classic liturgy for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, including the history of the mahzor and close reading of piyyutim (liturgical poetry). Texts will be taught in Hebrew.

PRACTICUM

Rabbinical Internship 1
Dan Judson

RB-PRAC-400-C1- 3 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Times TBD
Level: Year 4

Fourth year rabbinical students serve as rabbinic interns at Jewish institutions. Students will have on-site supervision. Internships are designed to enable students to understand the relationship between their theoretical education and their practical learning.

Leadership Seminar
Susan Shevitz

RB-PRAC-510-C1- 2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Thursdays 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Level: Year 4

The goal of this seminar is to deepen your understanding of how clergy become effective and even visionary leaders in order to advance your leadership capacities. It uses case studies from the field -- your own (internships and others'), as well as several conceptual frameworks, to investigate the interpersonal, organizational and communal contexts in which rabbis do their work. Specific themes that will be explored will include some of the following (dependent on participants' interest): developing a personal vision for Jewish life that informs your rabbinate/cantorate; understanding how formal and informal authority is used; recognizing technical and adaptive challenges and the role of the leader in addressing each kind if challenge; defining boundaries and managing expectations (your own and others'); empowering others while maintaining your own position; recognizing how religious, cultural and educational organizations change and the importance of forging coalitions, partnerships and supporters; using the organization's culture to move a vision forward; and confronting the dangers of leading.As you approach the transition from student to rabbi or cantor, the question of what it means to lead as a rabbi or cantor is likely to loom large. This seminar provides a setting in which to address this question by (a) considering theories and assumptions about leading, (b) reflecting on your own experiences when faced with opportunities to lead a team, group or organization; and (c) experimenting with new approaches to leading.

Management Seminar
Dan Judson


RB-PRAC-518-C1- 2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Wednesdays, 10:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Level 5

This course will introduce students to budgeting, development, working with boards, supervision, as well as planning and assessment. Guest lecturers with backgrounds in particular fields will help with instruction.

Rabbinical Internship 2
Dan Judson

RB-PRAC-550-C1- 3 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Times TBD
Level: Year 5

Fifth year Rabbinic students will be placed in internships and student pulpits at synagogues and other Jewish institutions in the greater Boston area.

RABBINICS

Core Text -Talmud 1: Berakhot 2
Micha'el Rosenberg

RB-RAB-101-C1- 4 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Level: Year 1

A continuation of the fall semester, we will complete the fourth chapter of tractate Berakhot, then continue on to a study of sugyot relating to the sacrificial service, Shema, and the Amidah, as a means of thinking about various approaches to and purposes of ìprayer.î The focus continues to be both on building skills that are necessary for reading, understanding, appreciating, analyzing and participating in Talmudic discourse and on developing more sophisticated and nuanced thinking about prayer.

Core Text - Rabbinics 2A: Mo'ed
Eliot Goldberg

RB-RAB-201A-C1- 3 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Levels: Years 2, 3 and 4
Mondays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

This course is centered upon the intensive study of selected sugyot from the first chapter of Sukkah. Concentrating on sugyot about the requirements for the construction of, and spending time in, the Sukkah, we will explore a plurality of ways in which the talmudic rabbis understood practices central to the holiday and consider the following questions: What is the experience of building and spending time in a Sukkah about? How can the talmudic conversation about Sukkah add meaning to our own celebration and observance of the holiday today? How does the academic study of Talmud add to my understanding of the talmudic conversation? How can I incorporate the texts of the Talmud into my practice as a Rabbi to help others understand and find meaning in their own practice? As we consider these issues, we will solidify and expand upon textual skills built during previous semesters of study.

Core Text and Rabbinics 2B: Mo'ed
Micha'el Rosenberg

RB-RAB-201B-C1- 3 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Levels: Years 2, 3 and 4
Mondays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

In this course we will study selected sugyot from the tenth chapter of Tractate Pesahim. We will spend the first half of the semester studying material about the seder, and the second half studying sugyot about kiddush and havdalah for Shabbat. Our focus will be on learning skills for reading and understanding Tosafot, and in particular the ability to read sugyot quickly for understanding.

Core Text and Rabbinics 2C: Mo'ed: Hagigah
Nehemia Polen

RB-RAB-201C-C1- 2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Levels: Years 2, 3 and 4
Mondays, 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

We will focus on Tractate Hagigah, whose major themes include: Pilgrimage and encounter with God in the Jerusalem Temple; education of children and definitions of maturity; the Rabbinic movementís self-understanding, including the nature of derashah (scriptural interpretation); early Jewish mysticism; master-disciple relationships and competition in disciple circles; gradients of holiness; purity and mindful orientation; and the role of festivals in blurring social divisions and creating communitas. We will examine Hagigah's Mishnah, Tosefta, Yerushalmi, and Bavli, and the relationship between these corpora. Students are expected to read the primary texts with fluency and comprehension. In addition, you will be asked to read and summarize articles in Hebrew and English, reflecting recent research on the theology, legal reasoning, and modes of transmission of early rabbinic literature, and make class presentations on these topics.

Hilkhot Yom Tov A
TBD

RB-RAB-216A-C1- 2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Tuesdays, 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Level: Mekorot

This course will cover textual sources and issues relating to specific areas of spring and autumn festival practice. Its goals are both to help students become familiar with these materials and to develop their understanding of the halachic process and their capacity to engage in it. The course involves analysis of halachic material, much of which is not available in translation, and is thus appropriate for students with advanced text skills.

Hilkhot Yom Tov B
Allan Lehmann

RB-RAB-216B-C1- 2 graduate credits
Non-credit not available
Tuesdays, 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Levels: 2, 3 and 4

This course will cover textual sources and issues relating to specific areas of spring and autumn festival practice. Its goals are both to help students become familiar with these materials and to develop their understanding of the halachic, process and their capacity to engage in it. The course involves analysis of halachic material, much of which is not available in translation, and is thus appropriate for students with advanced text skills.

Hilkhot Tefilah
Shayna Rhodes

RB-RAB-518-C1- 2 graduate credits
RB-RAB-518-NC- 2 non-credits
Thursdays 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Level: Year 1

This course will introduce students to primary halachic texts relating to tefila in terms of personal practice and prayer leadership. We will study both Ashkenazi and Sephardic sources that explore the traditional obligations one has as a Jew and as a leader with regard to tefila. What are the daily obligations? What are the required characteristics of a shaliach tzibbur? What are the rules surrounding the reading of Torah to the community? We will begin to think about all of these questions as we experiment with practice and look around our school and our local communities to see how tefila is lived in our surrounding environment.

Introduction to Talmud
Shayna Rhodes

CG-RAB-520-C1-4 graduate credits
CG-RAB-520-NC- 4 non-credits
Mondays, 2:30 - 4:00 p.m. and Wednesdays, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Level: Mekorot
Students in this course will learn the skills of analyzing a variety of Talmudic texts, aggadic and halakhic. How are Talmudic sugyot (thematic units of a Talmudic tractate) constructed? What are the recurring technical terms of a Talmudic ìdiscussionî? What are the conceptual assumptions of Talmudic discourse? What are the social and cultural contexts of the sugyot? Students will learn basic Talmudic terminology, including a glossary of Hebrew and Aramaic terms and concepts, and how to use dictionaries, concordances and other reference tools to decipher and understand a Talmudic sugya. This course also includes selections from the commentaries of Rashi and the Tosaphot with an examination of their interpretive concerns and methods. Students will be required to record selections from the Talmudic texts in order to improve skills in reading Rabbinic Hebrew. Some previous exposure to rabbinic literature is desirable.

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