Summer 2013 Courses


Registration for Summer 2013 Is Now Open!

Hebrew (On Campus)
           
COURSE TITLE
 
INSTRUCTOR
 
TIME
 
DATE
 
CREDITS
 
COURSE NO.
 
Hebrew 3 Davis M-Th, 9 am-1:30 pm June 17-July 11
(campus closed July 4) 
4 UG CU HEBRW 203
Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complicated structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of classical and modern texts and conversation. Sessions will include readings of longer passages from modern and classical texts, as well as dialogues and abridged stories. Students will listen to stories and recorded dialogues, participate in open conversation and write short expository passages. All language skills will be mastered through the syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs.
Hebrew 4 Davis M-Th, 9 am-1:30 pm July 22-Aug. 15 4 UG CU HEBRW 204
Building on the language skills students have developed in Hebrew I through III, this course will continue to strengthen students' reading comprehension, grammar, written and oral language skills in modern Hebrew, as well as reading and comprehension of rabbinic texts. Attention will be paid to the grammatical forms and structures, as well as vocabulary expansion.
Intensive Hebrew Grammar Roth M-Th, 9 am-1 pm June 17- July 25 non-credit only CU HEBRW 215
Open to current and incoming rabbinical students only. All others need special permission from the Dean of the Rabbinical School before registering.
 
Hebrew (Online)
           

All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.

COURSE TITLE
 
INSTRUCTOR
 
TIME
 
DATE
 
CREDITS
 
COURSE NO.
 
Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 0 CU HEBRW 010
Designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students progress at their own pace, submit oral and written homework, and take online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala" ("Hebrew From Scratch"), the textbook used by Hebrew College's campus-based and online Hebrew language programs. No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required.
Hebrew 1 Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 4 UG CU HEBRW 110

Enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology and acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
Hebrew 1A Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 2 UG CU HEBRW 111A
Covers first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1-7, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
Hebrew 1B Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 2 UG CU HEBRW 111B
Covers second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8-14, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.
Hebrew 2 Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 4 UG CU HEBRW 210
A continuation of Hebrew I Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew I. Prerequisite: Hebrew I or placement test.
Hebrew 2A Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 2 UG CU HEBRW 211A
Covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15-21, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew I or placement test.
Hebrew 2B Levy Online June 10- Aug. 16 2 UG CU HEBRW 211B
Covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22-28, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 1." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.
Hebrew 3 Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 4 UG CU HEBRW 310
Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation. Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.
Hebrew 3A Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 2 UG CU HEBRW 311A
Covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1-4, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.
Hebrew 3B Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 2 UG CU HEBRW 311B
Covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5-8, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.
Hebrew 4 Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 4 UG CU HEBRW 410
Designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs. Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.
Hebrew 4A Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 2 UG CU HEBRW 411A
Covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9-12, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test.
Hebrew 4B Levy Online June 10-Aug. 16 2 UG CU HEBRW 411B
Covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13-16, of "Ivrit Min Hahatchala, Vol. 2." Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.
 
Jewish Studies and Jewish Education
 
 COURSE TITLE
 
INSTRUCTOR
 
TIME
 
DATE
 
CREDITS
 
COURSE NO.
 
Hiddur Mitzvah: Beautifying Jewish Life Nashman-Fraiman Su, 6-8 pm; M-Th, 9 am-4 pm; F, 9 am-1 pm June 23-28  3  CG INTD 548
This seminar will be a week-long inquiry into the ways that Jews beautify places and objects in their quest for "Hiddur Mitzvah." We will look at the historical setting when these objects were created and the various artistic strategies and media used by the artists. Using the tools of art history, history of religion and social history we will gain a new understanding and appreciation of Jewish life through the ages. We will also gain new insights into the origins of some of our most familiar Jewish ritual objects. There will be one field trip and one hands-on workshop.
Educating for Character: What Professionals Need to Know
Lerner
Su, 3-6 pm; M,W, 10 am-4 pm; Tu, 10 am-4 pm, 6-8 pm June 30-July 3  3 CG EDUC 730
Students will learn to identify the professional competencies and intellectual foundation that educators need in order to integrate character and ethics education into their work. We will examine philosophical ideas at the core of virtue ethics. We will study the relationship between ethics and character; religion and character; mind and character; and suffering and character. We will discuss character development as a lifelong process/endeavor, and explore various approaches to teaching values and educating for character in the synagogue, school, or camp. Finally, we will investigate controversies in the field of character education, and challenges and opportunities unique to Jewish education. Syllabus.
Philosophical and Spiritual Questions in Jewish Education Meskin M-Th, 9-3 pm (includes lunch break); F, 9 am-12 pm; One evening TBD 6-9 pm (includes dinner) July 29-Aug. 2 3 ED JLS 6230
Open to students enrolled in the joint Doctoral and Certificate in Jewish Leadership Studies program of Northeastern University and Hebrew College.

This course explores a range of philosophies of American Jewish education and how they are the personal expression of leadership paradigms and of institutional paradigms.  How are the ideologies and philosophies of Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, communal (nondenominational), and humanist approaches to contemporary Judaism reflected in our educational venues? What are the ways in which Jewish educational philosophies draw from and relate to contemporary philosophies of education in America and translate theory into practice of self and of institutions? What are the spiritual and ethical dimensions and dilemmas in Jewish education?
Philosophical and Spiritual Questions in Jewish Education Meskin M-Th, 9-3 pm (includes lunch break); F, 9 am-12 pm; One evening TBD 6-9 pm (includes dinner) July 29-Aug. 2 3 CG EDUC 930
Permission of the Dean of the Shoolman Graduate School of Jewish Education required.

This course explores a range of philosophies of American Jewish education and how they are the personal expression of leadership paradigms and of institutional paradigms.  How are the ideologies and philosophies of Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, communal (nondenominational), and humanist approaches to contemporary Judaism reflected in our educational venues? What are the ways in which Jewish educational philosophies draw from and relate to contemporary philosophies of education in America and translate theory into practice of self and of institutions? What are the spiritual and ethical dimensions and dilemmas in Jewish education?
Special Education for Jewish Settings Hornstein Online June 10-Aug. 16  3 CG EDUC 551
An introdution to the field of Jewish special education, drawing on a variety of sources. Students will gain a foundation in the field of special education, including history, laws, best practices for students with special needs and the impact of disabilities on the individual and family members. Traditional and contemporary responses to special education within the Jewish community will also be discussed. Syllabus.
Creating a Developmentally Appropriate Early Childhood Curriculum Brody Online June 10-Aug. 16  3 CG EDUC 502
This course focuses on the skills necessary for planning and implementing curricula for early childhood classrooms. The holiday cycle will be studied as a basis for integrating art, music, science, mathematics and language arts as well as Jewish values, customs and symbols into classroom practice. Syllabus.
Pervasive and Potential Forces in Informal Learning Experiences in Jewish Education Copeland  TBD June 2-23   3 CG EDUC 714 
Offered to students in the Pardes Educators program in Jerusalem. This course takes place in Israel. 

Both within and outside the formal classroom, unconscious subtleties of experience are working their effects on the spirits of all involved. Within the classroom, the often unplanned and unacknowledged ways in which students and teachers interact are influential; often more so than what happens in the explicitly directed routines of instruction. Outside the classroom, whole worlds of experience stake their claims upon our development, affecting us deeply; from computer games and interactive museums to the Internet's plurality of modes. This course will engage the character of these forces, which are generally more indirect and hidden, and thus necessarily much less developed in the formal structures of education.
Teaching Tanakh (Bible) Berkman Online June 10-Aug.16  3 CG EDUC 593
This pedagogic content course will focus on in-depth reading of selected Biblical texts that represent major genres of the Hebrew Bible, including narrative, law, prophecy, and poetry. The texts will be chosen for the opportunity they provide for teaching and understanding the methods of teaching Tanakh through various orientations. Each study unit will also include an opportunity for understanding the Bible in history, its literary commentaries and application to Jewish life and law. Spiritual and personal applications of the text incorporating different modes of teaching and learning will also be incorporated. Syllabus.
Intensive Workshop on Social Entrepreneurship Stolow Tu & W, 9 am-4 pm May 28-29  1 RB INTD 803

Open to students in the Certificate Program in Non-Profit Management only.

Social entrepreneurship describes the effort to look beyond traditional nonprofit and philanthropic approaches in order to create strategies and structures that are more effective, more scalable, and more sustainable. As nonprofits have adopted techniques from business, the boundaries that have traditionally divided the worlds of charity and commerce have blurred. Yet, the social sector is different from the business sector in fundamental ways. When an organization's primary objective is to catalyze social impact rather than to accumulate profits, that objective affects how leaders assess opportunities, mobilize resources, structure the organization, market its products or services, and consider expansion. A simple mapping of business frameworks onto a nonprofit situation is often neither appropriate nor effective. Rather, tools from the business world need to be adapted to a social purpose. 

In our two day intensive workshop on social entrepreneurship, we will explore issues of management and leadership in nonprofits that are striving to innovate, to engage with the market, and to achieve their mission through unconventional means. We will look at the individual and organizational attributes that foster entrepreneurial action. We will use readings, case studies, discussion, hands-on activities, and reflection to stimulate our individual and collective learning. We will strive to develop an understanding of the potential and the pitfalls of social entrepreneurship for the issues and organizations that we care about.

NETA
 
Only available to participating schools.
 
COURSE TITLE
 
INSTRUCTOR
 
TIME
 
DATE
 
CREDITS
 
COURSE NO.
 
Introductory Seminar NETA staff TBD June 23-July 4
(July 4 class will be held off-campus) 
3 NE EDUC 501
Introductory Seminar II NETA staff TBD August 11-22 3 NE EDUC 501
Hebrew Literature NETA staff TBD June 23-July 4
(July 4 class will be held off-campus) 
5 NE EDUC 906
History and Semantics of the Hebrew Language: Theory and Practice for Master Teachers NETA staff TBD July 7-18 5 NE EDUC 905
Fundamentals of Hebrew Linguistics and Hebrew Language Teaching NETA staff TBD July 7-18 5 NE EDUC 604