Summer 2017-2018 Courses


Courses may be available as a credit-bearing course or a non-credit bearing course. There is a difference in the course numbers for credit and non-credit courses. Be sure to register using the correct course number. You will be charged according to your registration.



 

HEBREW ONLINE 
All classes require purchase of a standard Hebrew-English dictionary.

All online Hebrew classes use Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch) as textbook either Volume 1 or Volume 2. See individual course description.
All Hebrew Online courses are offered June 6-August 18, 2017

Mekhina (Preparation) for Hebrew Language
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW 010-NC
Non-credit only
Offered online only
Prerequisite: No prior knowledge of Hebrew is required

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to Hebrew language study and to ensure that students with some prior Hebrew study experience begin Modern Hebrew I at comparable levels. The Mekhina introduces the Hebrew alphabet and vowels, as well as verbs and syntax sufficient for conducting simple daily conversation. Students work at their own pace, submitting oral and written homework, and taking online quizzes. Weekly real-time class discussions are conducted by the instructor with small groups of students at comparable levels. The Mekhina is based on the seven introductory units of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), the textbook used by Hebrew College’s campus-based and online Hebrew Language programs.  

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.
Mekhina will cover the introductory units of the textbook.

 

                             Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 1
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-110-W1 
4 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 1
Michal Levy 
CU-HEBRW-110-NC
4 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

This course enables students to recognize and use fundamental structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, and to acquire the necessary vocabulary for basic conversation and reading of modern and classical texts. All language skills are mastered through elementary syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the basic verbs in the different common active verb groups and their conjugation in the present and past tense. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures.

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.
Hebrew I will cover Lessons 1–14 of the textbook.


                              Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 1A
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-111A-W1
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew IA                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-111A-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew Mekhina or placement test.

This course covers the first half of Hebrew I, Lessons 1–7 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.


                                Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 1B
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-111B-W1
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 1B                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-111B-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew1A or placement test.

This course covers the second half of Hebrew I, Lessons 8–14 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.

 

                             Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 2
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-210-W1  
4 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 2                                 
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-210-NC
4 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

A continuation of Hebrew 1 Online, this course enables students to recognize and use additional structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology and vocabulary to read modern and classical texts, and to engage in conversation. Students will read and listen to stories and dialogues, and participate in guided class discussions. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write their own dialogues and passages. All language skills are mastered through more advanced syntactic and grammatical structures. Students will learn the past tense of verb groups introduced in Hebrew 1

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.
Hebrew II covers Lessons 15–28 in the textbook.

 

                              Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 2A
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-211A-W1
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 2A                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-211A-NC
non-credit
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or placement test.

This course covers the first half of Hebrew II, Lessons 15–21 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.

 

                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 2B
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-211B-W1
2 undergraduate credit
Offered online only

Hebrew 2B                     
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-211B-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 2A or placement test.

This course covers the second half of Hebrew II, Lessons 22–28 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 1.

 

                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 3
Michal Levy

CU-HEBRW-310-W1   
4 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 3                                 
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-310-NC
non-credit
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complex structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology, such as combined sentences, and will acquire vocabulary for advanced reading of modern and classical texts, and for conversation. Lessons include readings of longer passages, dialogues and stories. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the new syntactic and grammatical structures. Based on topics introduced in the lessons, students will write short expository passages and deepen their mastery of spoken Hebrew through participation in open conversation.

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. Hebrew III covers Lessons 1-8 in the textbook.

                             Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 3A
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-311A-W1
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 3A                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-311A-NC
non-credit
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 or placement test.

This course covers the first half of Hebrew III, Lessons 1–4 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

 

                              Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 3B
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-311B-W1
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 3B                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-311B-NC
2 non-credits
Offered online only 

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 3A or placement test.

This course covers the second half of Hebrew III, Lessons 5–8 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

 

                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 4
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-410-W1   
4 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 4                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-410-NC
4 non-credits
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test. 

This course is designed for intermediate students who have successfully mastered Hebrew reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will practice writing directed and complex sentences, as well as free composition. In weekly oral assignments and class discussions, only Hebrew is spoken. Through extensive readings, students will expand their vocabulary and increase their familiarity with grammatical patterns. Students will learn the future tense of basic verbs in the strong verb groups, as well as frequently used weak verbs.

Textbook: Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2. 
Hebrew 4 covers Lessons 9-16 in the textbook.

                               Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 4A
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-411A-W1   
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 4A                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-411A-NC
non-credit
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 or placement test. 

This course covers the first half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 9–12 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

 

                             Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Hebrew 4B
Michal Levy
 
CU-HEBRW-411B-W1   
2 undergraduate credits
Offered online only

Hebrew 4B                              
Michal Levy
CU-HEBRW-411B-NC
non-credit
Offered online only

 

Prerequisite: Hebrew 4A or placement test.

This course covers the second half of Hebrew IV, Lessons 13–16 of Ivrit Min Hahatchala (Hebrew from Scratch), Vol. 2.

Ulpan Hebrew on Campus 

June 12 – July 21, 2017
All courses listed below are offered non-credit.
Ulpan for credit is offered by special permission.
See the Ulpan webpage for more information including credit pricing.

Levels 1 and 2: Beginner
Monday – Thursday 9:30 – 11:20 am (4 times a week)

Levels 1 – 9
Monday & Wednesday 9:30 – 11:20 am
or
Monday & Wednesday 6:30 – 8:20 pm

Levels 2 – 6
Tuesday & Thursday 9:30 – 11:20 am

Levels 2 – 9
Tuesday 9:30 am – 12:30 pm
or
Friday 9:30 am – 12:30 pm


Jewish Studies: Residential Seminar 

                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Jewish Literary Modernism
Abigail Gillman
CG-INTD-526-C1
3 graduate credits
On campus: July 16 – 21, 2017
Sunday, July 16,  6 – 9 pm
Monday – Thursday 9 am – 4 pm
Friday 9 am – noon 

Jewish Literary Modernism
Abigail Gillman
CG-INTD-526-NC
3 Non-Credits
On campus: July 16 – 21, 2017
Sunday, July 16,  6 – 9 pm
Monday – Thursday 9 am – 4 pm
Friday 9 am – noon

 

This course explores important works by Shmuel Yosef Agnon, Franz Kafka, Dvora Baron, and other Jewish modernists in historical and cultural context. Our main emphases will be on close reading of the texts, and on developing skills of interpretation. We will also explore the history of Jewish literature; teaching methods; film adaptations; and the legacy of modernism in the twenty-first century. Note: Students will be asked to read all works in advance of the course, and to re-read while in residence.


Jewish Education

                                 Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Teaching Tanakh
(Pedagogic Content)
Jethro Berkman
CG-EDUC-593-W1
3 graduate credits
Online

**THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED**

Teaching Tanakh
(Pedagogic Content)
Jethro Berkman
CG-EDUC-593-NC
3 Non-Credits

Online

**THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED**

 

The Tanakh is the story of our people, the source of our traditions, and perhaps the most influential book ever written. In this course we will explore the content, context, structure and genres of the Tanakh, in order to bring the text to life for ourselves, and to help us to bring the text to life for our students. The course will provide students with the content knowledge, philosophical orientations and pedagogical tools they need to become sophisticated and compelling teachers of Tanakh.


                                Credit                                                                                               Non-Credit

Encountering Neurodiversity
(SPED or Pedagogic Content)
Nina Price
CG-EDUC-735-WI
3 graduate credits
Online
 

Encountering Neurodiversity
(SPED or Pedagogic Content)
Nina Price
CG-EDUC-735-NC
3 Non-Credits
Online
 

 

This course explores the field of Jewish special education through the lens of neurodiversity. By understanding both the strengths and challenges of learners with special needs, educators can more effectively and appropriately design Jewish educational experiences that meet various learners’ unique needs. The course will address both the neurobiological underpinnings of disabilities ranging from learning challenges to psychological disorders and pervasive developmental disorders, as well as particular Jewish communal responses to address them.

 

Supervised Field Experience I
TBA
CG-EDUC-915-C1
1 graduate credits
Hybrid
Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education CG-Educ-601

Supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week over two semesters is required. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All field experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education CG-Educ-601.


Supervised Field Experience II
TBA
CG-EDUC-916-C1
1 graduate credits
Hybrid
Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education and Field Experience I

Supervised experience in a Jewish setting (school, agency, synagogue, etc.) for the full academic year. A minimum of 6-10 hours per week is required over two semesters. Experiences will be tailored to meet the professional goals and objectives of the individual student. If appropriate, a current paid position may be incorporated into the experience. Supervision will focus on execution of emerging skills, observation and basic knowledge. All field experiences must be approved by the director of field experiences. Prerequisite: Models of Teaching in Jewish Education and Field Experience I.

Pardes Educator Program 

Pervasive and Potential Forces in Experiential Learning in Jewish Education 
Steve Copeland
CG-EDUC-714-J1
2 graduate credits
Open to Pardes Educators Only
Jerusalem

Both within and outside the formal Jewish classroom, unconscious subtleties of experience are working their effects on the spirits of all involved. Within the classroom, the often unplanned and unacknowledged ways in which students and teachers interact are influential; often more so than what happens in the explicitly directed routines of instruction. Outside the classroom, whole worlds of experience stake their claims upon our development, affecting us deeply; from computer games and interactive museums to the Internet's plurality of modes. This course will engage the character of these forces, which are generally more indirect and hidden, and thus necessarily much less developed in the formal structures of education.

 

Application to Practice: Experiential Education 
Alex Sinclair
CG-EDUC-692-J1
1 graduate credits
Open to Pardes Educators Only
Jerusalem

This one-credit course provides a theoretical exploration of experiential education, as well as a laboratory and practical workshop for students to experience and question various modalities of education outside the classroom. We will examine some of the contexts in which Jewish experiential education takes place.



IFJE Program:
Interfaith Families Jewish Engagement (IFJE) Summer Seminar
Keren McGinity
CG-EDUC-643-W1
3 graduate credits
On campus: July 16 – 20, 2017
Sunday, July 16, 6 – 9 pm (dinner & opening remarks)
Monday – Thursday, 9 am – 4 pm
Open to members of the IFJE Program only.

This course provides IFJE fellows with the unique opportunity for real-time synchronous learning at Hebrew College in Newton, MA. The seminar uses race as a lens through which to better understand Jewish intermarriage and interfaith families’ Jewish engagement. Students will grapple with sensitive materials as a small group, engaging with questions about Jewish peoplehood, identity construction, intermarriage politics, antisemitism, and inclusion. Such questions may include: Why do some people think that opposing intermarriage is racist and what are the counter arguments? How does using race to understand intermarriage expand our understanding of who is Jewish? To what extent do Ashkenazi and Sephardi perceptions of Jewish identity skew public discourse about intermarriage and engagement? What does “Half Jewish” really mean?  

Jewish Educational Leadership Program:
Seminar in Jewish Educational Leadership
Michael Shire
ED-JLS-901-C1
3 graduate credits
Hybrid
July 20-21, 2017
Thursday – Friday, 9 am – 4 pm
Open only to students in the JLS program
 

This course is an exploration of the current trends of research in Jewish education with a view to providing both broader understanding of the field of Jewish education as well as a deeper knowledge of the research methods used in Jewish education. The course is designed to support students in their consideration of research topics for their dissertation and foster an ongoing engagement with educational research as it pertains to academic research, foundation policy research and practice driven research. We will examine the philosophical, sociological, anthropological, and curricula approaches to Jewish educational research.


SCHOOL OF JEWISH MUSIC

SUMMER PRAYER LEADER INSTITUTE
http://www.hebrewcollege.edu/SJM-summer-institute
June 6 – July 28, 2017
COSEL and Rav-Hazzan students are required to take all classes for credit.
Individual credit-bearing classes are open to the public.
If you are interested in participating on a non-credit basis, please visit the website listed above.

June 6 – 27, 2017
Three Festivals Liturgy
Rabbi Debra Reed Blank
CG-LITGY-592-C1
3 graduate credits
Mondays -- Fridays, 9:30 am – 12:00 pm (times may vary by week)

This course is devoted to some of the liturgies unique to the Three Festivals, such as the fourth b'rakhah of the festival Amidah and certain piyyutim. We will also study some other units of the festival liturgy that are not unique to it, such as Torah reading, Hallel and Yizkor. For each unit, we will use three approaches. The first is historical, looking at chronological development. Secondly, we will observe literary features, such as structure, theme and use of language. Finally, we will consider the theological message. Each of these approaches (or a combination of them) can be further explored in the student's written work.


June 6 – 29, 2017
Three Festivals Nusach
Cantor Brian Mayer and Cantor Becky Khitrik
CG-CANTR-552-C1
4 graduate credits
Mondays -- Fridays, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm (times may vary by week)

Students learn musical modes for Ashkenazic prayer chant and analyze their structural elements. Students then learn the specific motivic content for leading Festival services within the Ashkenazic tradition. In practicum sessions, emphasis is on modal and motivic improvisation within the established framework of Nusach Ashkenaz. Students also learn appropriate congregational melodies for the Festival services.


June 6 -- July 11, 2017
Liturgical Hebrew
Dan Berman
CG-LTGHB-601-C1
1 graduate credit
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30 – 5:00 pm

This course is for students interested in delving deeply into the meaning and grammar of Hebrew liturgy. This course will focus on selected Sabbath prayers, concentrating on parsing the text to determine the core meaning of each word. The textbook will be Siddur Sim Shalom, 1985 Edition.
Prerequisite: Level 4 Hebrew or above




June 26 – June 30, 2017
Cantillation for the High Holidays
Cantor Vera Broekhuysen
CG-CANTR-535-C1
1 graduate credit
Monday – Friday, 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

In this course, we will study and practice common Ashkenazi melodies for the ta’amei hamikra (trope signs) used in chanting from the Torah on the High Holy Days. We will also discuss the history, performance practice, and texts of the High Holidays. Each student will prepare to chant one High Holiday aliyah from the Torah readings for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, from punctuated text, as their final assignment. Students will prepare and share a short drash (sermonette or discussion) on each of their assigned texts. Emphasis of the class will be on achieving fluency with the melodies, chanting accurately and with good pronunciation, and demonstrating textual understanding when chanting.

Prerequisites:

 

  • Proficiency in reading Biblical Hebrew.
  • Ability to learn melodies quickly – students will be asked to learn the trope melodies at home,
    before each class, and we will spend our class time practicing and applying them to texts. Recordings of the trope melodies that we’ll use are available at https://www.chantingthehebrewbible.com/listen for those who wish to study them before the start of the course (highly recommended).
  • Fluency in sight-reading trope from punctuated texts of Torah. Students do not need to already have the Jacobson melodies for the trope systems we study memorized, but they must be comfortable naming and identifying the different te’amim by sight.


Required texts and materials:
Jacobson, Joshua. Chanting the Hebrew Bible (Student Edition), Jewish Publication Society, Philadelphia: 2005
Keshet Te’amim Flashcards, personal use size; Created by Cantor Linda Sue Sohn


July 3 – 7, 2017
Cantillation for Haftarah
Cantor Vera Broekhuysen
CG-CANTR-536-C1
1 graduate credit
Monday – Friday, 9:30 am – 12:00 pm (no class on July 4, 2017)

In this course, we will study and practice common Ashkenazi melodies for the ta’amei hamikra (trope signs) used in chanting from the Haftarah. We will also discuss the history, performance practice, and texts of the Haftarot. Each student will prepare to chant one Haftarah reading as their final assignment. Students will prepare and share a short drash (sermonette or discussion) on each of their assigned texts. Emphasis of the class will be on achieving fluency with the melodies, chanting accurately and with good pronunciation, and demonstrating textual understanding when chanting.

Prerequisites:

  • Proficiency in reading Biblical Hebrew
  • Ability to learn melodies quickly – students will be asked to learn the trope melodies at home, before each class, and we will spend our class time practicing and applying them to texts. Recordings of the trope melodies that we’ll use are available at https://www.chantingthehebrewbible.com/listen for those who wish to study them before the start of the course (highly recommended).
  • Fluency in sight-reading trope from punctuated texts of Haftarah. Students do not need to already have the Jacobson melodies for the trope systems we study memorized, but they must be comfortable naming and identifying the different te’amim by sight


Required texts and materials:
Jacobson, Joshua. Chanting the Hebrew Bible (Student Edition), Jewish Publication Society, Philadelphia: 2005
Keshet Te’amim Flashcards, personal use size; Created by Cantor Linda Sue Sohn


July 3 – 12, 2017
Accompanied Repertoire for High Holidays
Cantor Marcie Jonas and Cantor Michael McCloskey
CG-CANTR-596-C1
2 graduate credits
Mondays through Thursdays, 1:00 – 5:00 pm (times may vary by week) (no class on July 4, 2017)

Students learn cantorial and congregational repertoire for High Holiday services that involves instrumental accompaniment, primarily keyboard and guitar.


July 10 – 14, 2017
Pedagogy of Music: Facilitating Tefillah
Cantor Ken Richmond
CE-EDUC-717-C1
1 graduate credit
Monday – Friday, 9:30 am – 12:00 pm (no class on Thursday, July 13)

This course can be taken as a follow-up to Teaching Tefillah (CE-EDUC-715) or can stand on its own. We’ll focus on our relationship with prayer, study texts about tefillah, and explore our role as a shaliach tsibur. We’ll experiment with leading various modalities of prayer and with teaching about tefillah within the context of a service.


July 13, 2017, Thursday
Singing Communities Workshop
Joey Weisenberg
CE-MUSIC-543-C1
1 graduate credit (Pass/Fail only)
9:30 am – 5:00 pm

This workshop will include three sessions:
Session #1:
Transformation of a Nigun:  Based on his extensive experience with nigunim (wordless melodies), nusah (prayer chant) and other musical styles, instructor Joey Weisenberg will teach how to explore the soul of any melody. Focusing on beautiful old melodies that may have been lost by history, as well as his own compositions, we will collectively bring the music to life.

Session #2:
The Torah of Music:  We will explores the spiritual teachings of music through studying a selection of Jewish musical-spiritual texts and stories. We’ll sing, too!
Where there is song there is prayer. (Brachot 6a)

Session #3:
Building Singing Communities:  Using ideas from his book Building Singing Communities, Joey Weisenberg discusses strategies for bringing people together to make music a lasting and joy-filled force in shul and Jewish life. We will sing, discuss, and have time for Q&A.


July 24, 2017
Jewish World Music
Various instructors
CE-MUSIC-544-C1
3 graduate credits (Pass/Fail only)
Monday – Thursday, 9:30 am – 5:00 pm; Friday 9:30 am – 12:00 pm.

Every day of the course will explore Jewish music and liturgical repertoire from a different part of the world. Various guest instructors will teach and lead music from India, Iraq, Yemen, Spain, Argentina, Eastern Europe, and more.


>